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Full text of "Historical sketch of the Sixteenth Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteer Infantry, April 1861 - May 1863 : St. Lawrence. Clinton. Franklin. First reunion, Potsdam, NY, August 31st and September 1st, 1886"

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HISTORICAL SKETCH 



OF THE 

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Sixteenth Regiment 






N. Y. S. Volunteer Infantry., 



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April, 1861 — May, i86v 







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ST. LAWRENCE. 



CLINTON. 



FRANKLIN 



FIRST REUNION, 



Potsdam, N. Y., 



August 31st and September 1st, 1886. 



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REQUEST. 
Comrades : 

The time has come to write the history of our regiment. This feeble 
attempt is a beginning. Its only merit is that the dates and figures are 
true to the records, which have been collected from the official accounts 
at Washington and Albany, and involved days and nights of labor to collect. 
Should another attempt be made to carry out more fully the history of the 
Sixteenth, and such a work should be written, not only of this Regiment 
but of all the northern New York Volunteers — one worthy of the subject 
— every man who had part in the events of their history can contribute to 
that work, for without such aid no history can be written. Read this 
little sketch, recall the events, write out the facts on the blank margin, 
adapted for this purpose, the names, dates of the killing, wounding, injury 
and death of every member of your company, together with other facts of 
interest, and send to me. Do this while life and health remain. I prom- 
ise to jealously guard all memoranda that may come to me, and to deliver 
them to any one who will compile the work, should I not do so. 

Yours sincerely, 

WM. W. THOMPSON, 

Albany, New York. 

Augusi 28th, iS36. 



1 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

OF THE 

Sixteenth Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry, 

FROM APRIL, 1861, TO MAY, 1863. 



THE ALARM. 

TN April, 1861, the loyal people of St. Lawrence, Franklin and Clinton 
■*■ counties, conscious of the peril to the Federal Government, to the pro- 
tection of which they had pledged themselves, amid the sullen echoes of 
Sumter's guns, gathered around their alters, swearing that they would not 
be deprived of their heritage and that they would not be despoiled of the 
fruits of their father's contests, that neither the might of Armies, nor the 
craft of Treason should prevail against their established, dear-bought, pecul- 
iar American Liberty. And when the first official call of the nation's Presi- 
dent for aid "to maintain the Laws and suppress Rebellion " reached the 
hills and rolling pastures of these patriotic communities, loyal fathers and 
mothers, wives and sisters, had already devoted their sons and husbands and 
brothers to their country. The men of the Sixteenth Regiment were mar- 
shaled in military bands,ready to move upon the enemy at once. And we 
knew even then that men who volunteered themselves to represent such loy- 
alty, to defend in war such a cause, must, indeed, render a good account of 
themselves, they must return from the conflict " with their shields or upon 
them. " Standing for these counties, to be tried in the fearful crucible that 
awaited it, the Sixteenth Regiment went forth, harnessed for the fight, self- 
devoted to the Republic. Its members did not take up arms in thought- 
lessness, or in restlessness, or for the prize of a military career, not dazzled 
by the pomp and glories of war, but simply and wholly for duty's sake and 
for their Country. When their work was fully accomplished they returned 
to the duties of civic life. They returned in triumph and honor, bearing 
their shields, but, alas, not all, for some of them, and how many, it was the 
Spartan alternative " upon their shields." 

The achievements of the Sixteenth, as indeed the glorious and heroic 
records of the Eighteenth, the Sixtieth, the Ninety-second, the One Hundred 
and Sixth, the One Hundred and Forty-second and the various other organi- 



4 Historical Sketch of the 

zations of Northern New York, speak a language of their own, leaving the 
historian little to chronicle, further than to enumerate the facts of their deeds 
of valor. For these breathe the fervid eloquence of patriotism, of loy- 
alty, gallantry,' fortitude, and fidelity to Country, which no words, however 
marshaled, can express. 

Time has not allowed, nor has it been attempted, to follow out in detail 
all the facts, incidents and minor events of our history. The fervor of the 
spontaneous movement to organize, here and there a company, having such 
ready response that two and three were filled to overflowing ; the presenta- 
tion of flags ; the preparation of useful mementoes which only love could 
conceive and devotion execute ; the emotions of sorrowful, but willing hearts, 
that gave us an affectionate farewell and a God-speed ; the sad and bitter 
parting from those near and dear, which in so many cases was the last on 
earth : the mingled sorrow and satisfaction beaming in the father's face, his 
heart aglow with gratitude and pride, that he had a son good and brave 
enough to become a guarantee of the perpetuity of the Union ; the long 
farewell look at the scenes of our birth, which to us had been our happy 
homes and all we then knew of the world ; and the silent reflections, which 
came to us when the eye no longer caught the familiar features of our 
youth, as we were rolled rapidly into the fearful unknown ; each of these 
tender reminiscences would, in itself, form a chapter of supremest interest 
to one and another, as it marks the first flow of those tears of bereaved love, 
that have ever since rained, and which will fall yet how often or how long, 
even mother, or wife, or sister cannot tell. But fond and tender as these 
suggestions are, we must pass on to other, and thrilling, scenes. 

How full of life, how full of courage and fiery zeal, company after 
company marched from their homes to fight the great fight and give up 
their lives if need be! Between April 15th, and May 8th, 1861, the 
various companies were organized and arrived at Albany, cheered and 
sustained by the splendid ovations which everywhere greeted them. May 
9th the Regiment was formed and the first field officers elected, who on 
the following day received their commissions. At this time more or less 
distrust existed in Co. B, its Captain proved unworthy, and the first 
sergeant, in disgust, deserted ! In Co. G two of its privates, becoming 
" homesick," refused to be mustered in. Captain Curtis, than whom the 
Army contained no braver or better soldier, made an example of them by 
marching them about the parade ground with "white feathers" stuck in 
their caps and, to the tune of the " Rogues March," drummed them out of 
camp. On the 15th the Regiment was mustered into the United States 
service, and was a part of the Army of the Union. Then followed the 
daily drill and discipline at the Industrial School which made the Sixteenth 



l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 5 

a first-class regiment from its date of muster ; and on the 30th it located a 
few miles below the city on the " Norman's Kill " and its new quarters 
called " Camp Morgan." Here the Regiment was uniformed and equipped 
and partially armed, during its stay receiving the most marked and kindly 
attention of the citizens. June 24th, that grand old War Governor, Edwin 
D. Morgan, and staff, reviewed the Regiment, and nearly eight hundred 
sturdv sons of Northern New York established themselves more fullv in the 
confidence and received the commendations of the Governor and the vast 
concourse of citizens who M had never before witnessed such excellent drill 
and soldierly bearing" and the exhibition target practice showed that the 
Regiment contained many skillful marksmen with the rifle. 

FORWARD MARCH. 

About noon on June 25th, the Regiment " broke camp " and marched 
to Steamboat landing amidst tremendous cheering from the assembled 
multitude, waving of handkerchiefs, throwing of bouquets, — the ladies 
showering oranges, cakes and other edibles upon the men, filling their can- 
teens with coffee, and in every way displaying their patriotism and esteem 
for the Regiment. 

Embarking in the evening, the Regiment reached New York in the early 
morning of the 26th, and landed at the foot of Fourteenth street, from 
whence it marched to Washington square, where, at 3.30 p. m., the Regi- 
ment received an elegant stand of colors and a National flag, — the former 
made by the donor and mounted by Tiffany & Co., — the generous gift of 
Mrs. Joseph Howland, who from first to last, as mother and nurse, was 
ever the guardian angel of the Sixteenth. This noble lady and her sister, 
unostentatiously, contributed lavishly in money and time to the alleviation 
of the suffering of the sick and wounded and in every way did their full 
duty and made their great " sacrifice at the altar of their country." 

In his address, Mr. Robert S. Hone said : 

"Col. Davies: — It is my privilege to stand here this day as the representative of 
Mrs. Joseph Howland, to present, in her name, these beautiful colors to the gallant 
Regiment under your command. She wishes me to make this presentation in as few 
words as possible. Her heart is. as you know, full of the tenderest emotions at this 
moment of departure of the Sixteenth Regiment for the seat of war, to take its full 
share of the perils, and to reap its full share of the glories of the campaign, and I can 
vouch for it that she, as fully as any one of you, is doing her duty, making her sacrifice 
at the altar of her country. Your mission is a sacred one. You go forth, representa- 
tives of this great State, battling for the nationality of your country, ready to lay down 
your lives, if need be, for the maintenance of law and order, on which rest all the 
foundations of society; the safety, happiness and well-being of yourselves, your families, 
your fellow citizens, are dependent upon your success in this holy cause. Go forth, 
then, fearlessly and cheerfully, in the full assurance that the prayers of those you leave 



r 



6 Historical Sketch of the 

behind will daily ascend to the Throne of Grace in your behalf, to nerve your arm, and 
to cheer your absent hours. I cannot more fittingly conclude than by quoting two 
lines from that beautiful hymn to the flag of Our Country: — 

"Then conquer you must, for your cause it is just, 
And this be your motto,—' In God is our trust.' " 

Col. Davies briefly responded to the address. He assured the ladies 
that it would ever be the dearest privilege of himself and his command to 
fight under the banners that day presented them. One was the revered 
flag of their country, the symbol of a nation's greatness and a people's 
freedom and happiness ; a flag endeared to them by every association, and 
by every tie that can link a patriot's heart to the home of his fathers. The 
other flag was endeared to them from henceforth, as the gift of a kind and 
gentle heart, who, in the hour when their country had called for their ser- 
vices, had prompted her, with her own hands, to prepare a regimental flag 
for them, — a flag which would ever call back their thoughts to the friends 
they had left behind them. Already my command is deeply indebted to 
Mrs. Howland for many articles of apparel of which the men had need 
while in Albany. This is not a time for speech-making, for I can assure 
you that this command prefers that its deeds shall speak for it, and the 
speech of this Regiment will be made behind these flags on the battlefield. 

Col. Davies then delivered the State flag to the color sergeant, who bore 
it to the line. Waving the National flag before the Regiment, he asked 
each company if they would defend it. A prolonged " Yes" rang from 
one end of the line to the other, followed by deafening cheers and waving 
of caps, with wild enthusiasm. And that promise was faithfully kept. ■ 

The line of march returning led to Pier No. 2, North river, through 
Union square, around the statue of Washington and down Broadway, the 
regimental band discoursing fine music and the crowds of people that 
lined the streets gave the Regiment most hearty and sincere greeting. 
Re-embarking, the Regiment remained on transports until the 27th, and 
then moved to Elizabethport and took passage on the New Jersey Central 
Railroad to Easton, thence to Harrisbunr. Leaving the latter place on the 
2Sth reached Baltimore, where, before entering the city, ammunition was 
issued. Marching through Baltimore in silence, a crowd of leering 
assassins, whose hands were red with the blood of the murdered boys of 
the Sixth Massachusetts, demanded of Col. Davies : — " Colonel, where is 
your music?" "In our cartridge boxes'" was the prompt reply of the 
Colonel, and the Sixteenth was the first regiment to pass through that city 
without some form of attack. Reaching Washington on the morning of 
the 29th, the Regiment encamped about a mile from the Capitol, where it 
remained under orders nearly two weeks. It was here placed in Col. 



P : 



16th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 7 

Miles' division and second brigade, composed of the Sixteenth, Eighteenth, 
Thirty-First and Thirty-Second New York regiments, under command of 
Col. Davies. Crossing the Potomac, July nth, from the Navy Yard, and 
reaching Alexandria, it encamped a little west of the city, under the guns 
of Fort Ellsworth, then building. 

BULL RUN. 

The boys had hardly time to reflect that they were now on the " sacred 
soil " and that earnest work would be expected of them, when the advance 
against the enemy at Manassas was ordered. In command of the revered 
and beloved Lieut.-Col. Marsh, the Regiment marched from camp July 
17th via. Braddock road to Fairfax Station. Coming upon the camp of 
the Fifth Alabama, a few shots were exchanged when the enemy fled, leaving 
a good dinner, ready prepared, which the boys discussed with a relish in 
presence of six sallow prisoners, who dined with less mirth. Early the fol- 
lowing morning, July iSth, marched to Little Rock Run, near Centreville, 
and halted till the morning of the battle, Miles' division forming the 
reserve. On the 21st the Regiment marched over Centreville Heights and 
down to Blackburn's ford, where the division held the left bank of Bull 
Run until dark. Here Col. Davies, left by the unfortunate condition of 
Col. Miles, in command of the reserve division, distinguished himself. 
Indeed, to him is due the credit of saving the army from a real as well as 
an imaginary defeat. After taking every precaution to prevent surprise by 
stationing a strong force at every avenue of approach, he sent his pioneers 
to fell trees and obstruct the roads, in order to prevent the approach of the 
enemy. Not a moment was lost, and the axes of the pioneers resounded 
through the woods and valleys from early morning until 3 p. m., when for 
miles the whole surface appeared as if recently swept by a tornado. 

The good effects of this movement were experienced not long afterward, 
when a large body of the enemy was seen returning from a vain attempt 
to pass over those roads, and they were scattered by a shower of shot from 
the batteries. In the meantime it had become evident that the enemy 
were forming in large numbers upon our left, and accordingly about 4 
o'clock, p. m., two companies of skirmishers were sent into the woods at our 
rear, supported by the Thirty-second Regiment. Soon, about two thousand 
cavalry and three thousand rifles of the enemy were seen at our left, 
filing through an opening in the woods, and coming into a valley about a 
quarter of a mile distant. They were permitted to advance until the 
rear of their column had entered the vallev, when our forces were 
ordered to change front so as to face them, and a company of infantry 
was placed between every two cannon. The Sixteenth Regiment was 



8 Historical Sketch of the 

then stationed on the right and the Thirty-first on the left of the guns. 
There, a well-directed shot from the 24-pounder fell among the rebels 
who brought up the rear, with such force as to kill several and cause the 
remainder to rush in close confusion into the lowest part of the valley. 
Then our batteries poured forth so deadly a deluge of grape and canister 
that the how] and groans of the wounded smote our ears even through the 
roar of the artillery. Yet the rifles of the enemy were not silenced, and for 
twenty minutes round after round did they fire, their shot flying harmlessly 
over our men, who were on the opposite slope of the hill lying on 
their faces in safety, no one of them being injured except Lieut. Hopkins, 
of Co. B. Sixteenth New York, who received a slight wound in the foot. 
Every effort was made by the foe to provoke our infantry to return their 
fire, but to no purpose ; our artillery alone replied, and they were obliged 
to retreat with greatly diminished numbers and in great confusion. Too 
much praise cannot be given to Col. Davies for forbidding the infantry to 
discharge their pieces, and to the soldiers for the self-control in obeying 
while exposed to so hot a fire. Had they disobeyed, the cavalry would 
have made a charge before the muskets could be reloaded, and, destroying 
our left, would have swept with fury upon the astonished center. 

After dark the great retreat was ordered, and Col. Davies command 
appeared to be all that remained of the magnificent army of three days 
before. The Sixteenth continued its march to Alexandria, and arrived 
there on the 22nd, in as good condition as when it left, except the wound- 
ing of Lieut. Hopkins. The retreat was made in six hours, and covered 
the whole distance passed over in an advance of four days. The entire 
army made good time on the 22nd. 

The boys were now veterans, and it was a source of amusement to them 
to have members of the new regiments, who were constantly arriving, look 
them over as curiosities, and in the light of the long inactivity which fol- 
lowed the tragical farce of First Bull Run, that battle became ancient his- 
tory and the boys unconscious relics, before the " On to Richmond " of the 
following year. 

The following is Col. Davies' official report of his part at Bull Run. Col. 
Miles, remaining for several weeks too full for utterance, made no report of 
his division : 

Headquarters 2nd Brigade, 5TH Division, \ 
July 27, 1S61. j 

To Col. Rfitet, commanding jth Division: 

Agreeably to general order No. 9, the 2nd Brigade, commanded by me, consisting of 
the Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Thirty-First and Thirty-Second Regiments, and Company G, 
2d Artillery (Green's light battery), took the advance of the Fifth Division, moving on 
Fairfax Court Mouse by way of the old Uraddock road, south of the turnpike road. I 






l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 9 

found the road very difficult for heavy artillery, and barricaded by trees felled across the 
road as often as once in a quarter of a mile, requiring the constant use of the pioneer 
corps. After passing over many of these barricades, we came to a blind barricade, 
directly across the road, and evidently intended for artillery; after making reconnois- 
sance, we found a small picket posted behind it, when my advance pickets were 
ordered to charge and tire upon them, which they did, dispersing it under a running 
fire. No one on our side was injured, and we never turned aside to ascertain whether 
any of the enemy were killed or not; the pickets reported, however, seeing several 
men fall. 

This running fire and reconnoissance was continued to within one mile of the Fairfax 
Court House, the enemy continuing retreating and firing upon our advance pickets at 
every convenient opportunity. After the exchange of fires, a reconnoissance was made» 
discovering many abandoned masked batteries, and at last quite an extensive temporary 
fortification about one and a half miles from Fairfax Court House, out of which we 
drove the enemy, who left their camp equipage, clothing, swords and the like. We 
then pressed into the encampment of the Fifth Alabama Regiment, which fled before us, 
eaving many valuable articles, guns, camp equipage, tents, corn, stores and personal 
Da gg a ge of all sorts, and their hospital sick — taking the road, as we understood, to Cen- 
terville and Manassas Junction. At this point, having received information that Gen. 
McDowell had taken possession of Fairfax Court House, the Fifth Division encamped 
partly on the ground of the Fifth Alabama, and the balance in the vicinity of the cross- 
roads. 

I have to report to you that we had three men wounded — one in the leg, one in the 
side, and one through the hand; we did not stop to examine the effect of the shots 
which were made, but it is reported to me that as many as fifteen or twenty were seen 
to fall in the woods. I have to report to you further the energetic manner in which 
Lieut.-Col. Young, of the iSth Regiment, in charge of the advance guard, performed 
his duty, and, further, that not a single man of any regiment fell back for an instant, 
but, on the contrary, the most determined bravery was displayed by even' man who 
came in contact with the enemy. Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Thos. A. Davies, 
Col. Com. 2nd Brigade, Fifth division, Troops of north-eastern Va. 
F. H. Cowdrey, Acting Assistant Adj.-Gen. 

What followed the unhappy termination of the engagement at Manassas 
is familiar to every one. The Sixteenth shared in the universal gloom 
which for a time settled down upon the nation. Instead, however, of occa- 
sioning despondency and despair, the Bull Run defeat furnished an addi- 
tional incentive to action, and the soldiers impatiently awaited their time. 

THE WINTER OF <6i AND '62. 

The Regiment remained in camp near Fort Ellsworth, engaged in routine 
and picket duties, until Sept. 15th, when camp was moved to the site of Fort 
Lyon. Here it was assigned to the Second brigade, Gen. Slocum's, in 
Franklin's division. This brigade was composed of the Sixteenth, Twenty- 
sixth and Twenty-seventh New York, and Fifth Maine, regiments. A few 



r 

I 



10 . Historical Sketch of the 

weeks later, Oct. 4th, the Twenty-sixth New York was assigned to 
some other brigade and the Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania took its place, 
and was not subsequently changed during the period of service of 
the Sixteenth, except by the addition of the One hundred and 
twenty-first New York early in September, 1862. The position of 
the brigade in the Army of the Potomac, however, was changed. 
Upon the organization of March 13th, 1862, it was the Second brigade 
(Slocum's), First division (Franklin's), First corps (Mc Dowell's)._ In 
May, following, it was the Second brigade, First division, Sixth corps 
(Franklin's), and in this relation it remained until it left the field, at which 
time Gen. Brooks was in command of the division, Gen. Bartlett of the 
brigade, and Gen Sedgwick of the corps. 

The spot where the regiment encamped from Sept. 15th to Oct. 7th was 
designated " Camp Lyon," after the hero of Springfield, Mo., and Slocum's 
brigade built the fort known as " Fort Lyon." A thousand axes soon felled 
the dense forest of half-grown pines, and in six days heavy siege guns were 
mounted, to which were added many others as the work progressed. Here 
the entire camp was surrounded with breast-works, and daily rumors of " the 
enemy are advancing in large numbers," compelled them to go to their daily 
work, rifle in hand, and to sleep at night upon their arms, ready to repel an 
attack at a moment's notice. The long hours of work, the constant vigil, and 
the low grounds on Hunting creek, produced much sickness, and numerous 
fatal cases of typhoid fever, and long suffering, occurred during the Fall and 
Winter. October 7th, the regiment moved to a site half a mile to the south- 
east of Fairfax Seminary, and went into winter quarters at " Camp Franklin." 
Here the long, weary days and nights were passed in the exercise of all 
sorts of ingenuity to stretch the small wedge tents to the proportions of 
fair sized dwellings, with marvellous success ; in reading, keeping clean, 
drilling, perpetrating practical jokes, and in many cases several Canadians, 
who were unable to read or write, were taught both, and the real pride of 
these men when they could write and read their own letters, was ample 
reward to the patient instructors. On one occasion, the two wings of the 
Regiment engaged in a snowball battle, and it is amusement to this day 
for the boys of the respective contestants to relate how their side defeated 
the other ; of course, both sides won easily. Now and then picket duty 
along the Orange and Alexandria turnpike relieved the monotony : when 
out for a week or two, the pickets would organize little squads, and in the 
dead of night actually visit the camp of the enemy, in disguise, or go 
within the enemy's lines, visit some still or tobacco factory and bring away 
a good individual supply. 

The grand review by Gen. McClellan took place while the Sixteenth 



V* 



1 6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. n 

were encamped at Camp Franklin ; the troops, over seventy-five thousand, 
were assembled at Bailey's Cross-Roads early in the day to await the arrival 
of their chief. Towards noon Gen. McClellan appeared, accompanied by 
President Lincoln and other distinguished personages, and as the party 
rode along the front of the line, cheer after cheer rent the air. Having 
assumed a stationary position on an elevated spot, the various commands 
passed in review before them. The day was mild and beautiful, the roads 
in good condition, the men in fine spirits, and the review presented a most 
imposing spectacle, surpassing anything of the kind ever witnessed in 
America. If any American, any man, did for personal or political ends 
trifle with or sacrifice that grand army — had the heart to do it — then total 
depravity is possible and infinite wisdom can err. 

The shooting of Johnston, under sentence of court-martial for desertion 
to the enemy, his clever capture by Col. Jackson of the 5th Maine, his 
undoubted foul intent, which, if successful, must have endangered many 
better lives than his own in the Sixteenth, was also a source of temporary 
interest. After sentence, Johnston was placed in an open wagon, seated 
on his coffin, and carried before the division, formed in three sides of a 
hollow square. He was then placed in about the center of the square, 
seated upon his coffin, blindfolded, and shot by a detail of his own com- 
pany, and then as he lay upon the ground, the fatal wounds exposed, the 
division was marched so that every man came within two feet of either side 
of the body. For some days Cos. B and G of the Sixteenth were in danger 
of having to furnish the detail of executioners, because these companies 
were on picket at the time, and Johnston's plans were to lead the enemy 
upon them in the night. The officers at least informed Cos. B and G that 
no one need hesitate to act, as the guns would be handed loaded to the 
detail and one of the guns have a blank cartridge, and which no one knew. 
Few regrets were expressed when the danger passed, for the true soldier 
wants and yields a fair show when the question of a human life is at issue. 

Here Col. Davies left the Regiment, with many regrets, but his merited 
promotion, and the acceptance o( his place by that grand man, Col. Joseph 
Howland, alleviated what otherwise would be a source of personal loss to 
every member of the Sixteenth. 

THE ARMY MOVES. 

On the 10th of March the Army of the Potomac unfurled its banners 
and began the forward march. Comprised of legions of brave men per- 
fected in discipline through long months of drill, supplied with everything 
pertaining to the material of war, and headed by a general the very men- 
tion of whose name inspired deeds of daring — in this grand army were cen- 



12 Historical Sketch of the 

tered the nation's hopes. The long delay was ended, the public pulse 
quickened, and with light heart and elastic step the volunteer marched away, 
confident that he moved to victory. 

The Sixteenth took up the line of march to Fairfax Court House and 
bivouacked until the 14th, and then returned to Burton's Tavern, and 
thence the next day to the old camp. It was here that the army learned 
that the enemy had retreated, after beleaguering the capitol, blockading the 
river, and keeping the army at bay for more than six months. On the 6th 
of April, as part of McDowell's Corps, the Regiment went by rail to Man- 
assas Junction, and from thence marched ten miles to Cattett's Station, 
through a drenching rnin. After remaining here three days, the order 
annexing the division to McDowell's command was revoked, and Gen. 
Franklin returned by rail to Alexandria to form a part of the expedition to 
the Peninsula. April 19th the Regiment embarked and arrived at Ship 
Point, near the mouth of York river, on the 22nd, landed and remained on 
shore until the evacuation of Yorktown. While here the boys waded far 
out into the river and bay and gathered an abundant supply of fresh oysters 
and clams, on which they feasted with a relish. An innumerable army of 
insects, known under the general appellation of wood-ticks, were very 
annoying. They would burrow in the flesh of both man and beast, and, 
regardless of the consequences, " pinch " and pull with all the tenacity 
of the horse leech. On May 3d the Regiment re-embarked and moved to 
Yorktown, where it remained till the battle of Williamsburgh, on the 5th, 
and the following morning moved up York river to West Point, landed 
at Brick House Point, on the south side, just at night, threw out pickets 
and kept constant vigil through the night, under orders to challenge no 
one, but fire upon every object that should approach from any direction. 
The following morning was fought the battle of West Point. Only 
companies F and G were engaged, under the immediate command of 
Capt. Gilmore. In this battle the enemy practiced the most barbarous 
brutality upon our wounded. One of the Sixteenth had his throat cut and 
another had not less than seven bayonet stabs on his body ; neither of 
these had otherwise fatal wounds, and all of the dead and wounded 
were stripped of their valuables and clothing. Comment is unnecessary. 

The following abstracts from the official reports show the fighting quali- 
ties of the companies engaged. Captains Gilmore and Curtis are the only 
officers of their rank specially commended. The other companies sup- 
ported Porter's and Ayers' batteries during the engagement. The records 
show Companies F and G to have lost six killed, sixteen wounded and two 
missing : total, twenty-four. 

In his official report of West Point, Gen. Franklin, then commanding the 
division, says : 



MPIftH 






l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 13 

* Two companies of the Sixteenth N. Y. Regt. were in the commencement of the 
engagement and behaved well. Captain Curtis (later General), in command of one of 
them, was severely wounded." 

And Gen. Newton, in his report, says : 

Gen. Slocum generously furnished me with three companies of the Sixteenth N. Y. 
Vols., and Capt. Gilmore, who commanded them, has received the commendations of 
his superior officers for the skill and gallantry displayed during the action. Capt. Curtis, 
whilst bravely leading his company in a charge, was shot in the left breast and severely 
wounded. 

At the conclusion of the action, the Regiment marched three miles up 
the York river to Eltham, and encamped for a day ; thence towards Cum- 
berland three miles, and remained two days. Here the Sixth Corps was 
organized. Cumberland was reached on the 15th; White House on the 
1 6th, and Tunstall's station, five miles from White House, on the 19th, 
and encamped at Cold Harbor. From this point, the Regiment made an 
advance upon Mechanicsville, and in the absence of the enemy, who had 
gone on a like raid, reached the village, captured several prisoners, the 
officer's baggage, mail and a quantity of supplies ; had a pleasant visit 
with several ladies and returned to camp without the loss of a man, though 
some sharp skirmishing took place. A few days after, some other com- 
mand made a like attempt and that place was taken only after a hard fight. 
The Regiment later encamped there upon the battlefield and by climbing 
trees, the steeples of Richmond could be seen and the ringing of church 
bells distinctly heard. From this camp, Co. B, during the battle of Fair 
Oaks, skirmished across the Chickahominy and had a spirited bout with the 
enemy but lost no men. Returning to Cold Harbor the Regiment assisted 
in building bridges, the enemy's sharp-shooters keeping up a constant fire 
from the tops of trees, behind logs, and from every object of concealment, 
by day ; and, not content with this sort of annoyance, they frequently 
threw shot and shell at our encampment, many of them striking among the 
tents, and got up demonstrations, compelling the Regiment to " turn out " 
at very unreasonable hours. Standing knee-deep in the water, six hours, 
or bearing on their shoulders huge logs, under this sort of inconvenience 
in no way contributed to their comfort. Co. B, however, was more fortu- 
nate than the others. Lieut. Geo. L. Eastman, though in very feeble 
health, remained with his company, and daily, at the noon rest, weak as he 
was, prepared at the camp kettles of coffee, beans and beef, hired a 
" coon " and bore them to the weary boys. He was ever a man, and had 
not his health failed him, against which he hoped and struggled many 
months, he would have made a record second to no officer in the Sixteenth. 
The custom, so prevalent at the commencement, was soon almost dis- 



14 Historical Sketch of the 

continued, as too costly for both sides, and now, instead of " blazing 
away " on the slightest pretext, the pickets patrol their beats, day after day, 
within speaking distance, without molesting one another. 

The Regiment crossed the Chickahominy on the 20th of Tunc and 
rested on the field of Fair Oaks, and all nature showed evidence of that 
murderous conHict, when tens of thousands bore down upon barely a 
division, and unsuccessfully tried to cut them off, or thrust or crush them 
into the river. 

Nearly three months had now elapsed since the Army left Alexandria 
and begun the Peninsular Campaign. Yorktown had been evacuated, the 
bloody battles of Williamsburgh, West Point, Fair Oaks and Seven Pines, 
besides several lesser engagements fought, the troops arrived before and 
around Richmond, and our labors were about to be crowned with success 
by its capture. And on the evening of the 26th the news of a great victory 
spread through the Army, creating the wildest joy. Men who had by con- 
stant hardship, and by continually looking on death, almost forgotten the 
feelings of joy, now broke out in loud shouts of gladness ; but while the 
Army was rejoicing at this temporary success, it was losing one of the 
grandest opportunities ever presented it for entering the enemy's Capital. 
The whole plan of Lee was based upon a false calculation. He believed 
that the main body of our Army was on the North side of the Chicka- 
hominv, but in fact onlv Porter remained on that side. Under this error 
Lee had brought nearly the whole Army across the river. This was known 
to our generals, for while positive information was received that Jackson, 
with his large army, was marching to our rear ; the prisoners taken were 
none of them from his command. Thus, between our main force, of over 
eighty thousand men, and Richmond, less than twenty-five thousand of the 
enemy guarded their long line of works. A concentrated assault of the 
four corps, on the south side of the river, must have resulted in the utter 
rout of the forces opposed to them, and the road to Richmond free and 
clear. But the error of Lee was never suspected, and this grand opportu- 
nity was lost. During the night Porter fell back to Gaines' Hill, and the 
fearful battle of the 27th, fought only to be followed by the great retreat 
and the five day's fighting which succeeded. Truly, " Some one had 
blundered." The official reports of the commanding officers give the part 
taken by the Sixteenth in that memorable disaster, which was so unneces- 
sary and which blasted every hope and the gallant army, whose suffering, 
heroism and courage entitled it to victory. After June 27th, 1S62, the 
Sixteenth is known as the " straw hat " men of history, who fought hardest 
suffered most, and who could not be driven by the enemy, and never dis- 
obeyed an order, except when commanded to retreat. 



16 th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 15 

The Regiment was engaged on five of the seven day's retreat and 
sustained losses as follows : 

KILLED. WOUNDED. MISSING. 

June 27th, Gaines' Hill 4 6 *94 54 

" 29th, Garnett's Hill 1 3 3 

" 30th, Savage Station 3 5 2 

July 1st, Glendale 2 13 3 

" 2nd, Malvern Hill I 5 M 

53 220 73 

Total Casualties 34^ 

In his official report, dated July 8th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, Va., 
Gen. H. W. Slocum, referring to Gaines' Hill, says : 

" Col. Bartlett's Brigade took position on the extreme left of the line. He was subse- 
quently ordered to the right of the line to support Gen. Sykes, whose troops, fatigued 
by the long contest of this and the previous day, were nearly overpowered by the over- 
whelming numbers of the enemy. Great credit is due the brigade commander, Col. 
Bartlett, for his vigilance and untiring efforts on the field, as w«.ll as on the night 
marches. He was constantly with his command, cheering his men by noble example 
as well as words. 

The loss of the division in officers was particularly severe, not only in numbers but in 
the character of those killed and wounded. Lieut.-Col. Marsh was mortally wounded 
while in the thickest of the fight and has since died, and Col. Howland was so severely 
wounded as to be unfitted for duty. 

Of the many officers, non-commissioned officers and soldiers I cannot here speak in 
detail. Like soldiers and like men they performed their duty and met their fate, and a 
grateful country will long bear them and the thousand nameless heroes of this conflict, 
who have offered up their lives at the nation's shrine, in lasting and honored remem- 
brance. H. W. Slocum, 

Commanding First Division, Sixth Corps." 

In his official report Col. Joseph J. Bartlett, commanding the brigade, 
under date of July 7th, 1862, referring to Gaines' Hill, says : 



a 



At 5 o'clock p. M. I was ordered by Gen. Sykes to bring forward my men to support 
the troops on his left and a portion of his own command, who were unable longer to 
withstand the fierce attacks and withering fire of the enemy, who were slowly but surely 
forcing back the right of the entire line of battle. At this juncture I ordered forward 
the Sixteenth New York Volunteers, Col. Howland commanding. From the position of 
the regiment it was necessary to change front forward on first company under the most 
terrific fire of musketry, with the shells and round shot of two batteries raking over the 
level plain, making it seemingly impossible for a line to withstand the fire a single 
instant. But with the calmness and precision of veteran soldiers the movement was 
executed, and the line, giving three cheers, long and loud, rushed on to relieve their 
now routed friends, led by their noble Colonel and myself in person. The position was 
gained. The enemy now hurled his fresh troops in double numbers against my line, 
directing his heaviest fire upon my left, and the Twenty-Seventh N. V. Volunteers and 
Fifth Maine staggered back under the fearful fire; but it was the recoil of the lion to 



1 6 Historical Sketch of the 

gather new strength to support the undaunted resolution of every breast, and once more 
every man sprang to the front, where they nobly maintained the fight, without giving an 
inch of ground to the enemy, until long after darkness showed the flash of every mus- 
ket, and revealed to the enemy how small a force was holding them in check. To 
meet the tire which came from our left Col. Rowland, who held the right of my position, 
changed front forward on tenth company, and the line thus established held its position 
until all firing of muskeUy had ceased on the field, except that from my own brigade. 

From the moment the Sixteenth was engaged up to 8 : 30 P. M. that Regiment nobly 
held the position assigned to it, and the men regretted the necessity which compelled 
them to retire from the field. 

With many painful regrets I have to report the loss of 500 officers and men; Lieut. - 
Col. Marsh was mortally wounded in the neck by a Minie ball whilst riding in front of 
his regiment, waving his sword and cheering on his men to noble deeds. The service 
has lost in Lieut. -Col. Marsh an able officer and a true patriot, and his brother ofneers 
a genial companion and noble friend. 

To Col. Joseph Rowland I am indebted for maintaining the extreme right of my line, 
for nobly leading his regiment to the charge, and retaking two guns from the enemy. 
Whatever of noble, moral, physical and manly courage has ever been given by God to 
man has fallen to his lot. Cheering his men to victory he early received a painful 
wound, but with a heroism worthy of the cause he has sacrificed so much to maintain 
he kept his saddle until the close of the battle, and not till then yielded to the painful 
and exhausted condition to which he has been reduced. 

Major Seaver established a name on this occasion of which he may well be proud. 

He was fearless, enthusiastic and efficient, and nobly tills the place made vacant by Col. 

Rowland and the lamented Lieut. -Col. Marsh. Joseph J. Bartlett, 

Col. 27th N. Y. Vol., Commanding 2nd Brigade. 
Capt. H. C. Rodgeks, A. A. G." 

Every official report of the different commands engaged make reference 
to the wonderful charge of the Sixteenth, but the following can only be 
given. Col. Cake, of the Ninety-Sixth Pa., says : 

"At this moment Major Seaver, of the Sixteenth, rode up seeking the Brigade com- 
mander. He informed me that his Regiment was doing good work, but needed sup- 
port. I doubted the propriety of moving my line, but as he strenuously urged it, 
begging me for the " love of God " to close in on their left, I took the responsibility 
and moved my Regiment to the right until my men mingled with his. For more than 
one hour after this both regiments poured in their fire. Any disposition on the part of 
the enemy to charge us, when we first came upon the field, seems to have been recon- 
sidered, as their fire slackened and was much easier to bear as the dav declined. 

At 7: 15 o'clock P. M. Col. Rowland, of the Sixteenth, rode up to my center and 
informed me that his ammunition was giving out. We advised together, concluding not 
to retire until dark, he agreeing to fire until his men reached the last cartridge and then 
to rest with his pieces charged. While the enemy's fire was growing feebler in our 
front we were still subjected to an ugly cross-fire of round shot and musketry, that cut 
us obliquely from the right." (Signed) H. L. Cake, &c. 

Report of Maj. Joel J. Seaver, Sixteenth New York Infantry, of the 
battle of Gaines' Mill: 



wpr- 



16th Regiment, N. V. Volunteer Infantry. 17 

Headquarters, Sixteenth Reht. New York Volunteers. ) 

June 28th, 1S62. J 

Sir: — On Friday, the 27th inst., this regiment, under command of Col. Joseph How- 
land, in pursuance of orders from brigade headquarters, left its camp with the brigade 
at 5 o'clock A. M., near Courtney's house, on the south side of the Chickahominy river, 
to support General Porter's corps, then being engaged by the enemy on the north side 
of the river, in the vicinity of Gaines' Mill. The regiment was held at Duane's Bridge 
until 2 o'clock r. M., at which time the brigade was moved down the river and crossed 
at Alexander's Bridge, arriving on r he field of battle at Gaines' Hill at about four 
o'clock P. M., this regiment leading the brigade to its position, assigned by Col. Bartlett. 
commanding, on the right of the field. Here the regiment was formed in line of 
battle, and rested in a ravine, which protected it from the enemy's batteries, which 
were sweeping the field in every direction. In reaching this position from the point 
where we entered the field, near the center of the line, we were compelled to pass over 
a level plain a distance of about 500 yards under the fire of cannon and musketry, 
where three of our men were struck and disable-d by a cannon-shot. 

After lying in the ravine some fifteen or thirty minutes the regiment was, by order of 
Colonel Bartlett in person, advanced in line about 100 yards to a position on the plain, 
where it was halted for some five minutes and the men ordered to lie down. Again we 
were advanced some 50 yards to a fence, where we once more halted for a few minutes, 
when we again advanced, passing the fence and engaging the enemy, who were not 
over 50 yards distant. 

Our forces had alreadv been compelled to retire from the crest of the hill, leaving 
one section of a battery in the hands of the enemy. Steadily and with unbroken front 
the Sixteenth continued to advance, the enemy giving way before it, until it had regained 
the ground that had been lost and retaken the guns, one of which had been turned 
upon us. Here a road passed over the top of the hill, with high banks on either side, 

!in which the enemy had thrown themselves to resist our advance. Across this road we 
pressed amid a shower of bullets, and on the opposite side Colonel Howland ordered 
the regiment to change front forward on the tenth company, to oppose the fire of the 
enemy, which then seemed most destructive on our left. The change was made in 
good order, and our men poured in a deadly fire, before which the enemy wavered and 
fell back. We held this position for about one hour, until our ammunition was nearly 
exhausted, when, by direction of Colonel Howland, I endeavored to procure a fresh 
supply. Failing in this, however, I requested Colonel Cake, of the Ninety-sixth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, who was lying on our left, to come to our support. He accordingly 
moved the right wing of his regiment to the point indicated, and with his assistance we 
continued to hold the place till night set in, when the brigade, under the personal 
direction of Colonel Bartlett, was led from the field in as good order as it had been led 
on, with the exception of the heavy losses it had sustained. During our engagement, 
which lasted nearly one hour and thirty minutes, the Fifth Maine and Twenty-seventh 
New York Volunteers were doing efficient service in line on our left. 

I regret to report that in the early part of the engagement Colonel Howland received 
a flesh wound in his left thigh, but he still kept his horse, unmindful of aught but his 
duty and his command, and with the most undaunted bravery and marked coolness, 
rode through the leaden hail from right to left along his line, and continued to direct 
the movements of the regiment and cheer on the men during all the fight and conduct- 
ed the regiment from the field. His wound will disable him from duty for several 
weeks. 

2 



1 8 Historical Sketch of the 

Lieutenant-Colonel Marsh received a severe wound in the neck very soon after the 
regiment had crossed the road on the hill, a Minie-ball entering the left side of the 
neck and lodging against the vertebra. He bore himself bravely during the engage- 
ment, and at the instant he was struck he was riding up the line waving his sword and 
in the act of delivering a message to Colonel Rowland. Before the message was de- 
livered, or its purport made known, he was struck by the ball and fell instantly from 
his horse, and was borne off the Held in an insensible condition. 

Among the casualties to the officers of the line I have to report the death of Lieut. 
A.M. Barnard, Co. H, who was struck by a musket-ball in his forehead and instantly 
killed. Capt. Warren Gibson, Company H, was about the same time struck by a 
musket-ball, near the outer corner of the right eye, the ball passing through, back of 
and destroying the eye, and coming out near the left temple. Both these officers were 
nobly and fearlessly discharging their duty at their posts and cheering on their men. 
The command of the company devolved on Sergt. James M. Hamilton, who behaved 
with coolness and courage, and did himself great credit during the remainder of the 
day. Lieut. McFadden, Company K, had his right leg shattered below the knee, by a 
shell, Acting Adjt. -Lieut. Pliny Moore, Company C, was severely wounded in the 
right arm and side by a musket-ball, while in the fearless discharge of his duty on the 
field, Lieut. Charles Bentley was wounded slightly by a ball cutting off the end of his 
left thumb. 

Where no man faltered; where every one, officers and men, did their duty so nobly 
and so well, taking and persistently holding a position under a raking cross-fire, which 
reduced our ranks fully one fourth part, to particularize would be invidious, so far as 
I was able to observe the conduct of the troops not a man left the ranks till he was 
compelled to from wounds or to bear off a wounded comrade, and any temporary con- 
fusion or disorder caused by moving the battalion under a steady and galling fire was 
promptly corrected by the company officers, whose co duct, as well as that of the men 
under their command on this occasion, deserves the highest commendation. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. J. Seaver, Major, Commanding Sixteenth N. Y. Vols. 

R. P. Wilson, A. A. A. G., 2nd Brig., ist Div., 6th Prov. Army Corps, A. P. 

The incidents, the horrors, the awful scenes of the "Seven Days " retreat 
are too appalling and numerous for mention here. The wounded of three 
days had been collected at Savage Station, who, in addition to the sick, 
sent here after the retreat had been decided upon, presented an indescrib- 
able reality of woe. The writer lay in the midst of thirteen wounded, 
passed over by the surgeons as beyond help at 9 o'clock p.m. June 29th, of 
whom Corporal Johnston of his own company was one, and at 6 : 30 a. m. 
the next morning he was the only survivor. In front of the amputating 
tents the legs and arms, cut off, formed great heaps, tons in weight, many 
of the feet still having shoes on them. To add to the gloom and suffering 
of this multitude, they were informed that all who could not join in the 
march would be left behind. A large number of the poor fellows, deter- 
mined not to fall into the hands of the enemy, started bravely out, and 
through ail the retreat their weak and emaciated forms could be seen strug- 



1 6 th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. • 19 

gling along the weary way, with arms just amputated or undressed wounds 
bleeding at every step. But with spirits all undaunted and unconquered, 
and hope yet whispering words of cheer, many of them reached the James 
river, and have since recovered to recount experiences of suffering rarely 
endured in any other human misfortune. And the pleading, petitioning 
faces of those unable to speak or walk, not to be abandoned to the merci- 
less foe, melted the hearts and brought tears to the eyes of men who would 
endure any personal danger ; but no transportation could be had. A 
wounded member of the Sixteenth, just able to walk, joined the retreating 
sufferers, and, falling in with the Regiment, related the sad condition of the 
comrades he had just left, and, though then in line of battle, Capt. F. C. 
Tapley, having seen not far distant a few empty ambulances, left his com- 
mand and ordered them to the spot where the wounded of his Regiment 
were located, and when he found a member of Company B, or the Six- 
teenth, he was tenderly placed on board the ambulances, and three, at least, 
of the number still live, owing their lives to his prompt and humane action. 
These independent, self-directed acts would fill a narrative which alone could 
do justice to the individual men that make up the Sixteenth, and, indeed, 
each of the regiments of the Union Army. Charles P. Barns and George 
White, at Gaines' Hill, when the conflict ceased, remembering where their 
comrades had fallen, at great personal danger, were ceaseless in their efforts 
through the night in seeking them out and bringing the wounded from the 
field. Heroes like these were numerous, and the great regret of the writer 
of this hasty sketch has constantly been present with him that their names 
and acts are not known to him, but though no record is here made, the 
reward is certain, for the consciousness of having faithfully discharged a 
duty is its own reward, and " inasmuch as you have done it unto the least 
of these, you have done it unto me," is written of them. 

The Regiment remained at Harrison's Landing till August 16th. Much 
sickness prevailed among the members — weakened by the terrible strain 
and exposure of the previous months — owing to the unhealthy surroundings 
and impure water. Many died, and more were taken North, not, however* 
before the seeds of death had been implanted in their constitutions. Each 
company of the Sixteenth provided itself with wells, and afterwards enjoyed 
the luxury of pure water. The Army was abundantly supplied, and rein- 
forcements were constantly arriving. On July Sth President Lincoln 
reviewed the troops. As he rode along the lines and observed the thinned 
ranks and torn aud tattered flags, he was much moved — " he wept " — and 
the men began to regard him as the one disinterested " man in authority." 
Col. Howland also visited the Regiment, for the first time since Gaines' 
Hill. His suffering was plainly seen, and the men showed their love for 



20 ■ Historical Sketch of ihe 

him by going to his tent, and relieved each other's guard so that every one 
might take him by the hand. The enemy occasionally showed himself on 
the opposite side of the river, and now and then opened a vigorous fire 
from his batteries. The most terrific thunder storm struck our camp and 
the lightning made havoc among the baggage. Recuperation and routine 
duties consumed much of the time while located on the James. 

August 1 6th began the transfer of the Army to Washington, and the Six- 
teenth started to Charles City Court House, and for six successive days 
marched nearly twenty miles daily in the hot Southern August sun, and suf- 
fered with the cold at night, arriving at Newport on the 21st. Here it took 
the steamer New Brunswick for Alexandria, which it reached on the 24th, 
and went into camp, near the site of its first location in Virginia, and 
formed its old picket line on the 27th. On the 28th marched to Annan- 
dale, on the 30th to Fairfax, thence through Centerville to Crib Run, and 
there stood picket through the night, near Warrenton turnpike, where the 
valiant New Jersey brigade was slaughtered and captured, and brave, gal- 
lant, lion-hearted Phil Kearney was murdered, and the Army of the Poto- 
mac, almost regiment by regiment, exposed to the whole line of the enemy, 
till it was routed. Had Fitz-John Porter obeyed orders the terrible defeat 
of Pope would have been a grand victory. The machinations of politics 
may pardon Porter, but the men who had comrades slaughtered or lost 
dear ones here, or who saw the almost annihilation of the veteran Armv of 
the Potomac, can never condone the awful crime of which they believe him 
guilty. The usual retreat, after the victories of those days, began on the 
31st, and the Regiment fell back to Centreville Heights, and later in the 
evening to Fairfax Court House, and on Sept. 1st back to Alexandria, and 
went into camp at Fort Lyon. 

Five months of active campaigning had brought with it all the fortunes 
of war. Victory and defeat had anon perched on our banners. Brave 
spirits, innumerable, had been shot to death on the field, lain down in sickly 
swamps to die, or breathed their life away in Northern hospitals. The 
retrospect was not a cheerful one, for we knew not then but that all the 
precious lives that had been given were sacrificed in vain ; but we had 
enriched with their blood the whole line of march, and the land and the 
Government, which they loved and for which they withheld not their lives, 
were so much the more valuable, and these must and should be preserved. 

It was without regrets that the order to break camp came to the Regi- 
ment on Sept. 6th, when it crossed Long Bridge and marched into Wash 
ington with song and cheer, and as it passed Willard Hotel, Mr. Lincoln, 
Preston King, Judge James and others heartily joined in the chorus, " We '11 
hang Jeff. Davis on a sour apple tree," to the delight of the men. Con- 



' 



1 6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer- Infantry. 21 

tinuing to march through much of that night, and daily thereafter without 
event till the 14th, when the enemy appeared in force ; the Regiment 
passed through Jefferson and skirmished towards Burkettsville. The enemy 
seeing the line advance opened a heavy fire from the guns planted on the 
heights, but the Regiment passed rapidly forward on the double-quick over 
the fields and along the bushy edges of a stream, halted and then exchanged 
a few shots. In this most exposed position both color-bearers were shot, 
one being killed, and two sergeants and one officer wounded. Gen. New- 
ton, seeing the situation, in person ordered a charge. The Sixteenth, 
although in the third line, dashing forward, forced the enemy back with 
a rush, till a stone wall was reached ; here, reinforced, the rebels made 
a stout resistance, but the Sixteenth sprang over the fence and stone wall, 
mingled with the astonished Confederates, pressed on and up the mountain 
side, blazing volley after volley ; unmindful of the deluge of iron hail the 
gallant boys push on, clamber up the green glacis till the crest is reached 
and the foe driven in disorder down the western slope, leaving baggage, 
supplies, everything, including their wounded, in our hands. In this grand 
charge the Regiment captured more prisoners than the number of its own 
ranks and a large quantity of arms. Private James Allen, of Co. F, captured 
the colors of the Sixteenth Georgia Regiment from two flying rebel 
sergeants. The Sixteenth was the first to reach the summit and far in 
advance of all others, sent up such a cheer that the enemy, who knew it 
was not the rebel yell, broke along his whole line and fled. Grand, sub- 
lime, and, though not surpassed in brilliancy and daring by any single act 
of the war, a tear was dropped and all joined in a common sorrow ; in 
thirty minutes we had lost of our numbers, every one of whom was dear to 
us from long association, 32 killed and 90 wounded. Major Frank Palmer 
did splendid service at the stone wall in rallying the men, forming lines, 
and urging the charge, and the success of this charge forced the enemy's 
retreat from Turner's Gap, and compelled the stand at Antietam in a 
much less formidable position. 

Monday morning the Regiment stood in arms at sunrise, prepared to 
march to the relief of Harper's Ferry, only to learn that Miles had surren- 
dered, and it again went into camp. 

The Regiment remained encamped at the foot of the mountain in Pleas- 
ant Valley till the early morning of the 17th, when it advanced, arriving on 
the battle field of Antietam at 9 : 30 a. m. The march had been a rapid 
one. It was now a most critical moment — Mansfield killed, Hooker 
wounded, Sedgwick, Richardson and Crawford carried bleeding from the 
field — the enemy pressing on in overwhelming numbers, our own troops 
yielding — the day had been lost, but the steady tramp of the advancing 



22 Historical Sketch of the 

Sixth Corps arrived, and with two fresh brigades rushed forward, put the 
enemy to flight, and established the lines far in advance of where they had 
been at the opening of the fight. At about noon the Sixteenth took posi- 
tion near Dunker church, and about two hours after the Regiment was 
placed in the advance line of battle near the grave yard, and remained in 
that position through the night and till the evening of the 18th, under a 
galling fire from sharp-shooters, two being killed and three wounded of 
companies E and D. The official reports give the mentions made of the 
Sixteenth by its field and general commanders, referring to the Maryland 
campaign, and their publication was intended at this point, having been 
promised permission to make copies of them at the War department in 
Washington, and depending on this promise the writer has failed to examine 
other records. The reign of the "Confederate Brigideers " now in full 
power there and the following letter, which is false in fact, accounts for the 
absence of the official reports, which in the best form and language credit 
the Sixteenth with the honor of forcing the enemy from South Mountain, 
and the resulting failure of Lee's Campaign in Maryland. 

(official letter.) 

Adjutant General's Office, 

Washington, August 19, 1S86. 
Wm. W. Thompson, Albany, N. V., 

Sir: — Acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 12 instant enclosing a com- 
munication from Hon. John Swinburne, M. C, of Albany, New York, and requesting 
permission to copy for him certain records therein specified for the purpose of writing 
a history of the 16th New York Regiment; I have the honor to inform you that the 
enormous accumulation of business will prevent this office undertaking other than 
current work, and the rules of the Department prohibit the examination of its records 
by persons other than those employed therein. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

O. D. Greene, 
Acting Adjutant General. 

The enemy withdrew on the 19th, and the Regiment lay near the Poto- 
mac river at Bakerville, where it remained till Oct. 1st and then advanced, 
crossing the river on pontoons at Berlin, thence through Lovettsville and 
encamped. Continuing the movement towards Fredericksburg, it reached 
Bell Plains Dec. 4th and encamped till the 10th, when it marched to the 
Rappahannock, near Pollock's Mills : it then crossed the lower bridge on 
the 1 2th at Fredericksburg and took position next to the left of Gen. 
Meade's command, and remained on picket and skirmish duty till the 15th, 
and the men suffered intensely through these nights from the cold, while 
day and night they were under a constant artillery fire, but lost no one, 



r- 



l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infayitry. 23 

though the exposure resulted in the sickness of nearly one hundred men, of 
whom thirty-six died within the next six weeks : and in the winter quarters, 
about sixteen miles southeast from Fredericksburg, where the Regiment 
returned on the 19th, the farewell shots of deceased comrades were almost 
constantly sounding. 

In this condition the Sixteenth was unfit for further active duty, but it 
was ordered to Bell Plains m a severe snow storm and the most intense 
cold weather experienced during its service, without shelter, and for three 
days guarded the shipping at the landing. Here Sergeant Knapp, who was 
a most excellent soldier and ever a vigilant and careful officer, perpetrated a 
little practical joke, for which he was famous, on Latz, the hospital steward. 
The men stood for upwards of an hour in the drifting storm, while the offi- 
cers were vainly trying to relieve the commanders in charge of the post, 
whose men filled the only building for miles around. The tenacious Ger- 
man colonel was obdurate and refused to take his men out or see the officer 
sent to take his place. Latz frequently took his friends to the hospital 
wagon, and became happy with inward heat. Ed, as the boys always 
called him, having faith in the inspiration, became a violent anti-monopo- 
list, and silently stole away with the entire store of wine, brandy, etc., to 
the adjacent wooded hills, and there, in true communistic style dispensed 
the " stores " to all comers, who, having warmed to the subject, built fires, 
and soon the entire Regiment from the " wilds of northern New York " was 
comfortably encamped, and poor Latz was wildly seeking the culprit, 
threatening dire vengeance, exclaiming : " It vas dang seldom vare dot 
demishon vas." Latz had often lost his ''stores" before, and Ed. could 
probably tell how. 

The following day the famous, or otherwise, " stick in the mud " expedi- 
tion was commenced, and the Sixteenth shared its part in that folly, after 
which it returned to its old camp — a fragment of its former strength — where 
it remained till April 29th, 1S63, at which date nearly every member of the 
Regiment had returned. Again, after counting the few remaining days of 
its term of service, with a consciousness of duty well performed, the Six- 
teenth could return and point with pride to its record, one more effort was 
to be required of the Regiment — the crowning glory of its two years' career 
— and nobly did it add one more laurel to the wreath of honor which 
encircled the name of the gallant Sixteenth. 

The pontoons, not drawn on noisy, rumbling trucks, as they were in the 
former attempt by Burnside, were quietly borne upon the shoulders of the 
light brigade and placed in the river at intervals of twenty or thirty feet, no 
attempt being made to construct a bridge. The Sixteenth, to the number 
of about fifty men in each, were placed in pontoons at 4 o'clock a. m. and 



24 Historical Sketch of the 

bravely pushed to the other side. So stealthily had the operation been 
conducted that the enemy's pickets did not sound the alarm till they saw 
boat loads of armed men approaching. They had time to fire only two or 
three volleys and then fled. The Sixteenth was the first to reach the oppo- 
site bank, and rapidly clambered up its steep sides, rushed upon the sur- 
prised Confederates, finding the officers of their pickets fast asleep. The 
sudden zigzag blaze of the enemy's fire lit up the darkness, and it was a 
thrilling moment midway of the stream, in crowded boats, moving slowly — 
a target for a thousand rifles. Fortunately we were opposite a high bank 
and the flying bullets passed almost harmlessly over us. Two bridges were 
lain, and in less than thirty minutes after the launching of the boats the 
Sixth Corps was pouring over in two living streams, and in one hour twenty 
thousand troops were in position, ready for action. The Sixteenth stacked 
arms and rested, wondering what next and waiting for orders. Presently it 
was advanced to a road and the batteries of the brigade placed in position, 
when a terrific musketry fire opened upon us. ' Stern old Capt. Hexamer 
charged his brass pieces to the muzzle with grape and cannister, held his 
fire, and our officers were passing along the line commanding the men to 
hug the ground and not to fire till ordered by the buglers, or till the whites 
of the eyes of the steadily advancing rebels could be seen. On and on, the 
splendid lines, in three columns, of the enemy advanced. No gunner at 
the batteries could be seen, the air filled with the hiss of bullets and 
screeching shells, when suddenly, as if all nature was writhing in a torment 
of agony, the batteries belched forth in torrents of awful fire and thunder. 
Rapidly, beyond all description or belief, did the guns discharge. No life 
could exist for a moment in the deluge of death they poured forth, and the 
Confederates, whose almost entire force had been sent to execute this 
movement, were kept upon the ground, and in their absence from their line 
of forts a charge was ordered, and the boasted Heights of Fredericksburg 
were stormed by our brave boys and the stars and stripes planted trium- 
phantly over that "Gibralter of America." Proudly did the Sixteenth 
march up those heights on that fair Sunday morning, filled with true grati- 
tude and devotion. 

Advancing to join Hooker, the Regiment moved almost without opposi- 
tion along the plank road leading to Chancellorsville. Gen. Brooks' divi- 
sion, which took the advance, moved rapidly forward, but, instead of 
meeting Hooker's pickets, encountered a heavy force of the enemy at 
Salem Churck. They were concealed in a forest, and immediately rose 
from their masked position and delivered a murderous fire. The Sixteenth 
formed in line and soon became hotly engaged, when a deadly flank fire 
from the left placed the Regiment at the focus of a cross fire, and the 



l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 25 

ground was strewn with the bodies of the slain. But there is no wavering, 
and the boys, delivering the battle cheer, which is heard above the fierce 
roll of musketry, press forward, when new lines of the enemy form on three 
sides and concentrate their fire upon Bartlett's brigade ; at the focus the 
Sixteenth is from the first, and Lieut.-Col. Palmer falls, Lieut. Hesselgrave 
is dead, Capt. Best falls, Lieut. Bayne falls, Lieut. Cozzens falls, Capt. Wood 
is a prisoner, and twenty-eight brave boys are dead and ninety-one others 
bleeding with wounds, while forty-nine more are in the hands of the enemy 
and their fate uncertain. The broken ranks fall back, and Gen. Brooks 
sweeps the plains with a tempest of cannister from every gun at his com- 
mand, and hurls back the exultant foe. Darkness comes to our relief, but 
not till Bartlett's brigade had lost seven hundred of its veteran braves in 
twenty minutes. This was, indeed, an eventful day, and as the Sixteenth 
lay down to sleep that night all had heavy hearts at the results and serious 
apprehensions of the morrow. The dawn of Monday revealed the fact that 
the Sixth Corps was surrounded, and unarmed Confederates freely surren- 
dered, in the belief that its capture was a question of only a few hours. 
The situation was critical ; the enemy in front, left and rear, and an unford- 
able river on the right. The indomitable hero, Sedgwick, waited till night- 
fall, and, under cover of darkness, escaped. Lieut. Knapp, in command 
of two companies of the Sixteenth, was the last officer to withdraw from the 
field, he having been left on the skirmish line with no other design or 
expectation than to mislead the enemy for a time and then to fall into their 
hands with his command. He did remain till the rebels mingled with his 
men, and then, marching side by side with several of the enemy, escaped 
without the loss of a man, and recrossed the river with his Regiment that 
night. (TUe official reports of this action are also refused.) 

After the series of battles, terminating in the retreat of the Sixth Corps 
from Salem Heights, the Regiment leisurely returned to its old winter quar- 
ters, back of Falmouth, where the following orders were issued : 

Headquarters Sixth Corps, ") 
May 10th, 1863. / 
Special Orders. No. 11S. 

1. The term of service of the Sixteenth New York Volunteers having expired, the 
Regiment will proceed at once to Albany, N. V., the place of enrollment, where it will 
be mustered out of service. Upon arrival there, its arms, equipments, and public 
property will be turned in to the proper officers. The Quartermaster's department will 
furnish transportation from Falmouth. 

The General commanding the Corps congratulates the officers and men of the Regi- 
ment upon the honorable termination of their period of duty. They have deserved well 
of the Republic upon many battle fields and in many tiresome marches. Through all 
the vicissitudes of their two years' service they have preserved for their Regiment an 



26 Historical Sketch of the 

unblemished record. For their faithful services and gallant bearing, upon all occasions, 
the General commanding the Corps thanks them in his own name, and for the country 

By command of Major-General Sedgwick. 

M. T. McMa hon, -Assistant Adjutant-General. 

Headquarters First Division, Sixth Corps,) 

May ioth, 1863. j 
Special Orders, iVo. 44. 

The undersigned is happy to add his testimony to the good character of the officers 
and men of the Sixteenth New York Volunteers, whose term of service is about to 
expire. 

Their gallant conduct throughout the late campaign, and especially in the battle near 
Salem Church, excited his unbounded admiration. 

It is needless to say how much he regrets to lose them. His best wishes for their 
future happiness go with them. 

W. T. H. Brooks, Brig.-Gen'l Com. Div. 

Col. J. J. Seaver, Com. 16th N. Y. Vols. 

Headquarters Second Brigade,) 
May ioth, 1863. j 
Special Order, 1V0. jg. 

To the Sixteenth Netv York Volunteers : , 

The term of service of the Sixteenth New York Volunteers having nearly expired, the 
General commanding the Brigade desires to express to them the sincere regret which 
he, in common with many others, feels at having them severed from his command. 

During the past year they have been under his immediate notice, and have nobly 
borne their part of every hardship and privation which the command has endured. On 
the battle fields of West Point, Gaines' Hill, Charles City Cross Roads, Crampton Pass 
and Antietam, they showed themselves brave and gallant soldiers, ever ready to do 
battle for their country, and resisting to the last the onset of their country's foes. 

In this last terrible campaign they have shown their gallantry and devotion anew, 

and won the commendation and thanks of all their commanding officers. To those 

whom they left on the field, the country will do honor. To the wounded the General 

extends his sympathy, and to the Regiment that has, on so many fields, unflinchingly 

and patriotically gained and maintained its reputation, the General commanding the 

Brigade tenders his congratulation, with the hope that they may be soon numbered 

again amongst their country's defenders. By order of 

Brigadier-General J. J. Bartlett. 
R. P. Wilson, Capt. and Ass't Adj't-General. 

On May ioth, 1863, the Regiment left Falmouth, via Washington, Phil- 
adelphia, New York, reaching Albany on the 14th. Here it was met by a 
committee of the Common Council, Thomas McCarty chairman, and a 
large delegation of firemen, at the Hudson River Railroad depot, who 
escorted the officers and men to the Dclavan House and treated all to a 
bountiful breakfast. The appearance of the men, in their war-worn gar- 
ments, the torn banners, in shreds; and the fifteen wounded, were cheered 



1 6th Regiment, JV. V. Volunteer Infantry. 27 

enthusiastically by the vast concourse of people assembled to meet and 
welcome the first regiment to depart and to return. No eye was dry, and 
as the boys moved through the streets, their sadly thinned ranks brought 
grief to every heart. After the procession had finished their march, they 
halted at the Capitol, where Gov. Seymour addressed the Regiment in 
these eloquent and appropriate words : 

Soldiers of the Sixteenth Regiment : 

With the close of this day will expire the two years for which your Regiment was 
mustered into the United States service. Your thinned ranks are most eloquent wit- 
nesses that your duty, as soldiers of the Union, has been religiously discharged. When, 
on the 15th of May, 1SG1, you were mustered into service, your Regiment numbered 
Soo stalwart men. You went forth with your banners fresh and beautiful; you return 
with them worn and tattered, but more beautiful and more sacred to us, from the perils 
and hardships through which they have been borne. 

I congratulate you upon your return to our State, and upon the prospect of your 
speedy re-union with friends at home. Many who went with you, in the vigor of man- 
hood and health, have been denied this privilege. The records of the battles of West 
Point, Gaines' Mill, Crampton, Antietam and Fredericksburg, will account for the five 
hundred missing soldiers. Their bones are crumbling upon the Peninsula and whiten- 
ing the hills of the Blue Ridge. We welcome you, their comrades in arms, and in 
behalf of the People of the State, whom you have so honorably served, invoke the 
richest blessings of Providence upon you ! 

We will place your torn banners, amid others which will come to us from the battle- 
field, in the archives of the State, and cherish them as precious memorials. 

Soldiers ! You are now about to return to your homes, in the northern part of the 
State. You will soon look forth upon the beautiful waters of Lake Champlain, the 
rolling St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario, along whose different shores most of you 
reside. 

You will return to the duties of civil life, prepared, we trust, to discharge them with 
the same fidelity and honor you have manifested in the field. 

And now, let me give you a kindly word of caution before bidding you farewell. You 
are about to enjoy that repose to which you are so justly entitled, and to receive a por- 
tion of that pay you so hardly and honorably earned. Be prudent, be careful, and do 
not let the designing or the unprincipled rob you of your money — keep it for the hour 
of sickness, and for the aid of those near and dear to you. 

Again, as Governor of the State of New York, and Commander-in-Chief of its military 
forces, I thank you for your patriotic services. 

Col. Seaver's reply : 

To Your Excellency^ an J to the Mayor and Common Council of the City of Albany : 

I desire to express to you the thanks of this Regiment for this cordial and enthusias- 
tic welcome so unexpectedly extended to us. It is the more gratifying inasmuch as it 
was unexpected. 

I neeil not speak of the thinned ranks— of the trials and sufferings patiently borne — 
of the sickness, disease and battles which have so reduced our numbers. These have 
all become familiar topics in the history of all armies. You have been pleased to allude 



28 Historical Sketch of the 

to the services of this Regiment in flattering terms. I trust that those services have not 
been rendered in vain — that all our sufferings will not, under Providence, be allowed to 
pass for naught. The reception extended to us this day is a cheering indication that 
they will not. The enthusiasm of your citizens — old and young — shows clearly enough 
• that the heart of the people is still beating to the true measure — that their devotion to 
the old flag is as deep and undying as it was when the storm of battle first broke upon 
Fort Sumter. 

I would to God that every soldier in our armies were here to-day to witness this 
enthusiasm. It would warm their hearts and nerve their arms to more powerful blows 
and to more glorious deeds. But while this may not be, the spirit of the people can be 
imparted to them. 

Let it go forth from the Press, from Executive Halls, till the Armies of the Nation 
shall feel that there is but one people and one sentiment in all the loyal States, and 
that that people ami that sentiment are with the Army, in favor of a speedy and honor- 
able termination of this war, and the restoration of the power of the Government of 
the United States over all that are now in rebellion. This will be worth more than 
thousands of armed men, and will be most potent in influence. 

To your hands, sir, I am pleased to deliver the colors of this Regiment, that they may 
be preserved in the archives of the State. They are beaten by storm, torn by many a 
hostile bullet, but, I believe, they have never been dishonored. 

Let them remain as a testimony to the brave men who have fallen in their defence, 
and to those who are so soon to return to their homes — sobered by discipline and 
chastened by much suffering. 

Gov. Seymour subsequently visited the soldiers in the carriages. 

While in Albany a large number of the soldiers of the Regiment attended 
the North Dutch church, the seats in the north gallery being reserved 
expressly for them. The discourse of Rev. Dr. Clark, the eminent pastor, 
was truly eloquent, thrilling aud exceedingly appropriate, and was listened 
to with marked attention throughout by these war-worn heroes, their 
bronzed and scarred cheeks being frequently bedewed with tears — espe- 
cially when allusion was made by the Rev. Dr. to the sufferings and priva- 
tions they had endured for two years in defence of their country. His 
allusions to the many gallant companions they had left behind also brought 
many a tear from the soldiers as well as the congregation. 

May rSth Col. Seaver issued the following farewell address, the last 
order to the Regiment : 

Headquarters Sixteenth Reg't N. Y. Vols., ) 
Albany, May iSth, 1863. J 
To the Officers and Men of the Sixteenth Reft iY. Y. Vols.: 

As we are about to separate for our several homes, on the expiration of our term of 
service, I should d.j less than my duty if I failed to express to you my sincere gratitude 
for the promptness and alacrity with which you have obeyed all orders since I have had 
the honor to command the Regiment, my admiration of the patience with which you 
have endured every trial and fatigue, and the noble, self-sacrificing manner in which 
you have discharged every duty to your country. 



P'" 



16th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 29 

Among the first to enter the field at your country's call, yours has been no holiday 
work. Your thinned ranks and taltered banners speak more eloquently than words, of 
long and honorable service. For this your country will honor you with her highest 
praise, anil reward you v\iih her profcundest gratitude — the richest legacies bequeathed 
by any nation to a soldier and a patriot. I need not speak of your noble deeds at 
Gaines' Hill, at Crampton's Gap and at Salem Heights, in each of which engagements 
more t 1 an a quarter of your numbers fell. I need not allude to the other fields where 
your presence was felt in the services you rendered. You have written your own record 
in noble, patriotic blood, and no words of mine can add to the lustre of its page. In all 
these services — in all these privations — in all these achievements — we have shared in 
common; and it is my highest pride that you have borne so patiently and achieved so 
well. 

When the relations that have so long and so pleasantly existed shall cease, and we 
lay aside the character of the soldier to assume that of the citizen, let us not forget any 
of the obligations we owe to our common country — let us not, in the quiet of our homes 
forget her danger and her need. The Government must be sustained — its old flag must 
be upheld until it shall again wave over every State represented on its azure field. Not 
a star shall fall — not a stripe shall fade. To this we should all be ready to " pledge our 
lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." 

May God, in His healing mercy, soon restore to us all those who bear honorable 
wounds received in our late engagement, and give to the friends of those who have 
fallen in battle or perished by disease, strength to bear their bereavement. 

J. J. Seaver, Colonel Com'dg Reg't. 

While at Albany the officers presented a magnificent sword to Col. How- 
land, and the men an elegant Bible to Mrs. Rowland. In the fly-leaves 
of the Bible the names of the donors were engraved. These best friends 
of the Regiment felt deeply these marks of gratitude. 

On the 22nd the different companies were mustered out and returned to 
their various homes. The Sixteenth passed out of organization honored, 
and into history revered. 

At Gouverneur, Potsdam, Ogdensburg, Malone and Plattsburgh the 
returning heroes were received as only the loyal people of these commu- 
nities, who loved them well, and from whose numbers they went, could take 
them to their hearts. 



THE RETURN OF THE SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 



BY MRS. F. M. THRALL. 



Now vibrates every heart that hears 
The footsteps of our volunteers ! 
Fearless they went, but all untried; 
They now return, our praise and pride. 



30 Historical Sketch of the 

The flag' we gave them only bears 

Stains of war and noble scars; 

Ready! ah ready! was their word 

When the hrst notes of war were heard. 

We gave them God-speed through our tears, 

With trembling hopes and nameless fears, 

Mow nights of watching, days of fight, 

For our country and our right, 

Have proved their valor and their faith, 

And some have proved it unto death. 

Our hearts foreboded well the day, 

That some must fall in bloody fray; 

But they rest in a glorious bed, 

Who sleep with the immortal dead. 

Ye martyrs in this valiant band, 

In fairest lines your names shall stand, 

With patriots of the early time, 

And loyal souls of every clime; 

Toll for the brave we loved so well, 

In solemn peals a funeral knell. 

While all our hearts responsive sigh, 

How nobly did our heroes die. . 



LOSSES IN ACTION. 

The losses in action of the Sixteenth, as compiled from the muster-out 
rolls, reports of officers, memoranda of daily records of the Regiment kept 
by one captain, six lieutenants and eleven enlisted men, which agree in 
nearly every case, are as follows : 

KILLED. WOUNDED. MISSING. 

First Bull Run o I o 

West Point 6 16 2 

Gaines' Hill 46 194 54 

Garnett's Hill 13 3 

Savage Station 3 5 2 

Glendaie 2 13 3 

Malvern Hill 1 5 11 

Crampton's Pass 32 90 O 

Antietam 1 3 o 

Salem Church 28 91 49 

Total 120 421 124 

Total casualties in action, 665. 

The above figures are also verified by the newspapers of Albany, on the 
date of the return of the Regiment, based upon the statements of the offi- 
cers, who then had all the records of the Sixteenth with them. The Even- 
ing Journal, Atlas and Argus and Morning Express files have been 
carefully examined. The same records and memoranda show the deaths 
by companies, as follows : 



wr^ 



16th Regiment,. N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



3 1 



CO'S. 



Kield 
and Staff. 



Co. A. 
B. 
C. 
D. 
E. 
F. 
G. 
H. 
I. 
K. 



Killed nnd Died of Wounds. Died of Disease, Accidents, &c. 

OFFICERS. MEN. TOTAL. OFFICERS. MEN. TOTAL. 



TOTAL 

j ENROLLMENT. 



Totals. 



I 




i 








16 




3 


8 




S 


5 


108 


I 


14 


15 




8 


8 


106 




1 

«5 


15 




6 


6 


143 




14 


14 




12 


12 


112 


I 


{ IO 


IX 




IO 


IO 


.,. 


I 


1 

12 


'3 


I 
1 


5 


6 


in 

| 




\ 

12 


12 




" 


ii 


124 

[ 


1 ' 


12 


13 




*3 


13 


118 


! 

I 


IO 


ii 




8 

i 


8 


1 

132 

1 


I 


6 


7 


i 


IO 


IO 


120 


7 


"3 


I20 


I 


88 


1 89 


1221 



Total deaths in Regiment, 209. This number does not include those who died away from the Regiment 






At Gaines' Mills the color-bearers were three times shot down, and all 
except one of the color-guard were either killed or wounded. The regi- 
mental banner was in every 7 march and in every battle in which the Regi- 
ment participated. It was struck by a ball, while in the hands of the color- 
bearer, and the ferrule indented so that it could not be moved on the staff. 
At Crampton Gap, Corporal Charles H. Conant was instantly killed by a 
Minie-ball through the head, while holding one of the flags, and Corporal 
Robert Watson, of the color-guard, was shot through the leg, in this action. 

In all, the Sixteenth was engaged in eighteen reconnoissances, skirmishes 
and battles, and lost six hundred and sixty-five men, killed, wounded and 
missed in action. Twelve hundred and twenty-one men were enrolled and 
served some part of the two years the Regiment was in the United States 
service. When mustered out this number was reduced to two hundred and 
eighty-one, officers and men. 1221 less 281 gives total loss 940, of whom 
more than one-half are now dead. 



32 Historical Sketch of the 



LOSSES IX BARTLETTS BRIGADE. 



These tables of figures on casualties in action are from the official publi- 
cations of the War Department, and are based on the Colonels' reports at 
the date of each action, verified by pension papers and the muster-out rolls, 
furnished to me most kindly by Col. Win. F. Fox, of Albany, N. Y. 

SEVEN DAYS' BATTLES, INCLUDING GAINES' HILL. 

KILLED. WOUNDED. MISSING. 

Fifth Maine 9 49 11 

Sixteenth New York 40 181 12 

Twenty-Seventh New York 12 118 32 

Ninety-Sixth Pennsylvania 13 6i 13 

Total 74. 409 68 

crampton's gap, md. 

Fifth Maine 4 28 o 

Sixteenth New York 31 70 o 

Twenty-Seventh New York 6 27 o 

Ninety-Sixth Pennsylvania 20 71 o 

Total - ." 61 196 o 

Total loss of Army at Crampton's Gnp 

was 113 418 • 2 

ANTIETAM, MD. 

Fifth Maine o 5 o 

Sixteenth New York 1 2 o 

Twenty-Seventh New York & o o 

Ninety-Sixth Pennsylvania 1 1 o 

Total 2 8 o 

SECOND FREDERICKSBURG. 

Fifth Maine 11 58 27 

Sixteenth New York ^^ 70 49 

Twenty-Seventh New York 3 13 3 

Que Hundred and Twenty-First N. Y. 48 173 55 

Ninety-Sixth Pennsylvania 16 54 9 

Total in 36S 143 



i6th Regiment^ N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



33 



LOSSES IX "TWO YEARS' REGIMENTS." 



A table of casualties during their service of the first twenty " two years' 
regiments," as shown by the most complete records at the War Department 
at Washington and by the muster-out rolls at Albany : 



Date of 
Muster. 



Regiment. 



■ 



1 86i 



May 7, 

" 2t, 

" 14, 

" 9, 

" 9, 

". 25, 

April 23, 

" 23, 
May 4, 

April 20, 

May 13, 

" 14, 

" 17, 

" 15, 

" 24, 

" 17, 

" 17, 

" 17, 

" 6, 

June 6, 

May 21, 



1st National Guards, 



2d Troy Rules, 

3d Veterans, 

4th Scotts Life Guards, 

5th Duryea Zouaves, 

6th Wilson Zouaves. 

7th Steuben Regiment, 

8th German Rides, 

9th Hawkins Zouaves, 

10th 'three vear->' regiment), 

nth Ellsworth Zouaves, 

12th Independence Guards, 



16th btraw llatsot History 

17 Westchester Chasseurs, 
iSth New York Rifles, 
19th First Cayuga, 
20th German Turners, 
2rst Buffalo Regiment, 
22d Second N. Y. Regiment, 
27th Broome County Regt. 



K.ILLLED AND 


I»IKD OF 


I >1KI 


> OF 1 > 


SEASE, 






Wounds. 


Acc'ts, 


IN PR 


ISON, &.C. 


Total 
Deaths 


Of'c's 


En. 


Total. 


Of'c's 


En. 


Total. 




Men. 






Men. 






O 


88 


88" 


3 


33 


3° " 


124 


I 


24 


25 





23 


23 


48 


I 


25 


26 


2 


64 


66 


92 


2 


60 


62 


1 


2 3 


24 


86 


6 


183 


189 





3' 


3* 


220 





13 


'3 





34 


34 


47 


M 


88 


102 


1 


46 


47 


149 





89 


89 


1 


4t 


42 


131 


2 


74 


76 


2 


25 


2 7 


103 


3 


48 


5T 


3 


12 


15 


66 


3 


61 


64 


1 


59 


60 


124 


4 


67 


71 





29 


29 


100 


4 


56 


60 





44 


44 


104 


4_ 


«Q7 \ 
31 


III 

36 


1 
3 


85 


86 


197 


5 


29 


32 


68 


4 


34 


38 


1 


34 


35 


73 


2 


3i 


33 





54 


54 


87 


7 


54 


61 


1 


60 


61 


122 


2 


74 


76 


2 


40 


42 


11S 


5 


31 


36 


3 


29 


32 


68 


2 


71 


73 


2 


69 


71 


144 



There were in all thirty-eight " two years' regiments " from New York 
State. Except as above given the highest casualties occurred in the Thirty- 
Fourth Regiment, viz., 162. Thus the Sixteenth, with the single exception 
of the Fifth, stands on the records as suffering the greatest loss of all the 
thirty-eight New York regiments which served the same period and for the 
same time. These records credit the Sixteenth with twelve less than it in 
fact lost, and, no doubt, like errors occur with reference to others. 



34 Historical Sketch of the 



DEATH OF COL. HOWLAND. 

Col. Joseph Howland, of Matteawan, Dutchess county, N. Y., died at 
Mentone, France, of consumption, on April ist, 1S86. 

Col. Howland, at the organization of the Sixteenth Regiment New York 
Volunteers, in the spring of 1861, at Albany, joined the Regiment as its 
adjutant on the staff of Col. Thomas A. Davies, and served in that capacity 
until the organization of the old Sixth Army Corps, in the fall of 186 1, at 
Alexandria, Va., when he was promoted to be assistant adjutant-general on 
the staff of Gen. Henry W. Slocum, who was assigned to the command of 
the third brigade of that corps. In this position he served until March, 
1862. On the promotion of Col. Davies to be brigadier-general, at the 
unanimous request of all the commissioned field and staff of the Sixteenth 
Regiment, Major Howland consented to take the command of his old 
Regiment, and received his commission as its colonel in March or April, 
1862, just as the army was preparing for its "on to Richmond" movement. 
This appointment was hailed by the whole Regiment — officers and men 
alike — with a heartiness born only of admiration and respect for a throughly 
good soldier and a noble man. Col. Howland immediately applied him- 
self to the duties of his position. The comfort and welfare of the men of 
his command were his first and constant care. Order and discipline were 
rigidly enforced, and prompt obedience to all requirements was but a 
natural outgrowth which sprang from the love an intelligent soldiery bore 
to an urbane and dignified chief. No officer in the service ever devoted 
himself more unremittingly to the interests of his men than did Col. How- 
land to the old Sixteenth, from the time he joined it at Albany to its mus- 
ter-out at Albany in 1S63. Possessed of abundant means, he provided for 
the Regiment many luxuries and comforts which the government did not 
supply, for both camp and hospital, while his estimable wife and her sister 
devoted themselves with untiring zeal to the care of the sick and the wants 
of those who were well, following, like ministering angels, the Regiment 
and its fortunes wherever it marched and fought. 

Col. Howland commanded the Regiment in the desperate battle of 
Gaines' Mill on the 27th of June, 1862, when on the extreme right o( line 
it charged the enemy, recapturing a batter}- which had been lost earlier in 
the day, and retained its position until the exhaustion of its ammunition 
and the final onset of " Stonewall " Jackson forced it to retire, as the sun 
was going down. Early in this engagement, the lamented Lieut.-Col. 
Marsh was mortally wounded and borne from the field. At about the same 
time Col. Howland received a severe wound, but continued to direct the 






P*" 



i6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 35 

movements of the Regiment until it left the field. In this engagement, 
besides its colonel and lieutenant-colonel, the Regiment lost in killed and 
wounded 260 men, rank and file — fully one-quarter of its effective force on 
that day. No battle-scarred veteran ever bore himself with higher valor or 
inspired his command with more heroic bravery than did Col. Howland on 
this occasion. Brave, without rashness, he was at his post where danger 
was thickest. With a courage that scorned all danger, and with an intre- 
pidity that seemed to defy death, he led his men on the field and remained 
with them so long as there was hope. 

From the effects of the wound received on this day Col. Howland was 
compelled to retire from the service. But though no longer able to bear 
the fatigues of a campaign, he never forgot his old command, or ceased to 
care for its welfare. He visited the Regiment once at Harrison's Landing, 
and was once more with it at Albany on its return home. On this latter 
occasion the enlisted men of the Regiment presented to Col. and Mrs. 
Howland an elegant copy of the Bible, in which were bound the letter of 
presentation and the autograph signature of every man of the command 

then present. _ 1757864 

Subsequent to his retirement from the service he was brevetted a briga- 
dier-general, in recognition of his meritorious service and distinguished 
bravery on the field. 

Col. Howland was the youngest son of Samuel S. Howland, of the firm 
of Howland & Aspinwall, of New York, In physique he was not strong, 
and was thereby unfitted for the life of a soldier. His early education and 
training, received under the care of the best masters, had, however strength- 
ened his constitution, and developed a mind of unusual clearness and of 
great power. His executive ability was of a high order, and in the admin- 
istration of affairs he had few equals. He possessed a high sense of honor 
and a clear and quick conception of right and wrong. To the right he was 
inflexible. No art, device or subterfuge could so gloss the wrong that it 
would evade his keen detection and stern rebuke. This trait in his charac- 
ter was prominent, and no man could approach him without feeling that he 
was in the presence of a noble man. 

In 1S65 Col. Howland was elected Treasurer of the State of New York, 
and held the office for the ensuing two years. It is superfluous to say that 
the duties of the office were discharged in an upright and acceptable 
manner. 

He never fully recovered from the effects of his military service and the 
disabling wound which retired him, and much of his time since then has 
been spent in travel and leisure, seeking to regain that health which was 
then impaired. For this purpose he was abroad at the time of his death. 



^6 Historical Sketch of tlie 

Aside from his immediate family, Joseph Howland — the Christian gentle- 
man and the brave soldier — will have no sincerer mourners than the sur- 
viving members of the old Sixteenth New York Volunteers. 

Joel J. Seaver. 

April ioth, 18S6. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT. 

In the preparation of this little sketch I gratefully acknowledge generous and patient 
aid from Col. William F. Fox; Co!. J. S. Mc Ewan and Major Gilbert C. Rice of the 
Adjutant-General's office, Albany; Dr. John Swinburne, M. C. ; Joseph M. Brown, Gen- 
eral Freight and Passenger Agent of " The Western and Atlantic Railroad Co." 
by whose special consent the beautiful frontispiece was furnished me; accompany- 
ing this consent General Brown writes : " I hope that the re-union of the Six- 
teenth New York Volunteers will be a great success in every respect, and that the 
spirit of fraternal feeling which is once again returning among our people may 
increase to such an extent that the only associations which will be connected with the 
remembrance of our great war of 1S61-1S65 will be that of mutual pride that such 
magnificent bravery and endurance were shown to exist among the soldiery of the 
American people. 

In case any of the members of the old regiment should come south I trust that they 

may find pleasure in passing through the old scenes of their trials and their glory along 

the line of the Western and Atlantic Railroad between Chattanooga and Atlanta. 

Yours, very truly, 
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 23d, 1886. JosTM. Brown. 

Also, Miss Abby H. Woolsey of Matteawan; Col. Seaver, and Capt. Tapley, for doc- 
uments and memoranda of the Regiment, and to Messrs. Brandow, Barton & Co., who, 
as Printers, have been uniformly patient and indulgent, and have more than tilled their 
contract. William W. Thompson. 



l6th Regiment, N. V. Volunteer Infantry. 



37 






ROSTER AND RECORD OF THE OFFICERS AND MEN 

OF THE 

Sixteenth Regiment New York Volunteers 

During its service, May 15, 1 So I to May 22, 1863, in the United States Army. 

The Regiment participated in the following general engagements : 
July 2r, 1861, First Dull Run. 
Sept. 21, 1S61, Poilick's Church. 
May 7, 1S62, West Point. 
June 26, 1S62, Mechanics ilie. 
June 27, 1S62, Gaines' Hill. 
June 28, 1S62, Garnett's Farm 
June 29, 1S62, Savage Station. 
June 30, 1S62, Glendrde. 

July 1, 1S62, Charles City Cross Roads. . 

July 2, 1862, Malvern Hill. 
August 20, 1862, Second Bull Run. 
Sept. 14, 1S62, Crampton's Gap. 
Sept. 17 and 18, 1S62. Antietam. 
December 12-15, Fredericksburg. 
December 31, The Mud Campaign. 

April 28, May 3, Deep Bottom, Fredericksburg, St. Mary's Heights, and Salem Church. 
The Regiment lost at Gaines' Hill, Crampton's Pass and Salem Church, in each 
engagement, fully one-fourth its number taken into these actions. 

OFFICER'S ROSTER AND RECORD. 

NAME. ! _ D "- e c °L Remarks. 

commission. 

Colonels: ! (Mustr'd out May 22nd, 1863, when not otherwise stated. 1 

Thomas A. Davies June 20, 1861 Promoted to Brig. -Gen. of Vols. March 7, 1862. 

Joseph Howland I Alar. 12, 1862 Resigned September 28. 1862. Wounded at Gaines' Hill. 

Brev. Brig-Gen. U. S. V. \ 

Joel J. Seaver \ Nov. 29,1862 

Brev. Brig-Gen. U. S. V. \ 

Lieutenant Colonels: 

Samuel Marsh June 20, i86| Died July 4, 1862, of wounds rec'd at battle of Gaines' Mill. 

Joel J. Seaver. Aug. 20, x8#2 Promoted to Col. Nov. 29, 1862. 

Frank Palmer Dec. 17,1862 Wounded at Salem Church. 

Majors: 

Buell Palmer....- June 20, 1861 Dismissed Nov. n, 1861. 

Joe! J Seaver Dec. 12,1861 Promoted Lieutenant Colonel, August 20, 1862. 

Frank Palmer Aug. 20, 1862 Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel Dec 17, 1S62. Wounded. 

John C. Gilmore Dec. 17, 1865 

Adjutants: 

Joseph Holland July 4,1861 Promoted to Captain and A. A. G Sept. 16, 1861. 

Robert P. Wilson >epc. 24, 1S61 Promoted to Capt. and A. A. G. March n, 1863. Wounded 

David A. Nevin May 9,1863 at Glendale. 

Quartermasters : 

Arthur DeWint July 4,1861 Resigned Oct. 26. t86i. 

Henry W. Davies Oct. 29, 1861 

Surgeon: 

William D. Crandell July 4, 18611 

Assistant Surgeons: 

John H. Moors July 4, 1861 Discharged Aug. 7, 1862. 

Charles C. Murphy..... ...- Aug. 19, i362 Resigned Jan. 18, 1S63. 

Charles J. Pardu Sept. 3,1862 

Chaplains: 

Royal B. Stratum Sept. 30, 1S61 Resigned Oct. 31, 1861. 

Andrew M. Miller Jan. 16, i86a Resigned Sept. 26, 1S62. 

Francis B. Hal! Dec. 10,1802 

Captains: 

David A. Nevin ...... J 1 . 1 y 4, 1861 Resigned July 20, 1862. 

Isaac T. Merry I)=c. 9, 1862 

Franklin Palmer July 4,1861 Promoted to Major August 20, 1862. 

Royal Corbin 

Pliny Moore < 'ct. 4, 1862 Wounded at Gaines* Hill. 

James M. Pomcroy July 4,1861 Resigned July 6, i36i. 



ft 



38 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 



r 



NAME. 



Date of 
commission. 




Frederick C. Tapley Aug. 14, i86t 

George Parker J u 'y 4» 1S61 

John L. Stetson ". July 4, 1861 

1 j 

Ransom M.Pierce April 5,18^2 

Albert M. Barney Pec. 9,1802 

Charles H. Benlley Feb. 24,1863 

John C. Gilmore J vi ! y 4, 1861 

Henry T. Sanford Dec. 17,1862 

N. Martin Curtis July 4t t86i 



William L. Best Dec. 

Warren Gibson July 

Wilson Hopkins Dec. 

Joel J. Seaver July 

Peter L. Van Ness Dec. 

Charles M. Hillilcer Dec. 

William W. Wood July 

First Lieutenants: 

Peter L. Van Ness July 4, 

Isaac T. Merry Jan. 27, 

Henry T. Sanford Dec. 9, 

Oliver B Flagg Dec. 17, 

Royal Corbin July 4> 

Pliny Moore 

Charles L. Jones Oct. 4, 

Wilson Hopkins July 4, 

Edwin C. Knapp Dec. 17, 

Albert M. Barney Tuly 4, 

William H. Waiting Dec. 9, 

Ransom M. Pierce July 4, 

Charles H. Bentley April 6, 

Asaph Dodge Feb. 24, 

John A Vance July 4, 

John Snyder 

Simon C. Vedder July 

William L. Best Oct. 

Andrew C. Bayne Dec. 

Alanson M. Barr.hard July 

Peter La Fontaine Dec. 

Nelson Z. Cozrens Dec. 

Frederick F. Weed July 

Samuel W. Gleason Oct. 

John McFadden July 

William H Jamieson Oct. 

Second Lieutenants: 

Charles L. Jones July 

David A. Nevin Oct. 

Michael Cox M ay- 
Pliny Moore July 

Ira W. Hare Dec. 

George L. Eastman July 

William E. Hesselgrave Pec. 

Robert P. Wilson July 

William H. Walling Oct. 

William W. Hutton Dec. 

William H. Morris May 

Charles H. Bentley July 

Peter La Fontaine April 

Asaph Dodge Dec. 

Leonard J. Pierce Feb. 

Joseph Holbrook July 

Henry T. Sanford Sept. 

Alexander Kimberly Dec. 

William R. Helms Dec. 

William L. Best July 

Andrew C. Bayne Oct. 

John H. Austin Dec. 

Archibald S. Tucker 

Samuel W. Webster July 4. 

Frank H. Hamilton, Jr Mar. 20, 

Charles A. Brown Oct. 4, 

Milton E. Roberts July 4, 

Charles M. Hiiliker Dec. 12, 

Enos Hinman Dec. 17, 

Henry J. Carlton July 4, 



Wounded at Olendale. 

Promoted to l.ietit-Col. 59th regiment N. Y. V. March 13, 

1862. Killed at Antietam. 
Resigned June 26, 1862. 

Promoted to Lieut-Col. i42d regiment N. Y. V. June 21, 1863 
Wounded at Gaines' Hill. 
Promoted to Major Dec. 17, 1862. 

Promoted to Lieut-Col. i42d regiment N. Y. V. October 2t 

186.';. Wounded West Point. 
W ounded Salem Church. 



17, i86_ 

4, 1S62 Discharged Oct. 14, 1862. Wounded Gaines' Hill 
17, 1861 

4, 1861 

16, 1861 

17, 1862 
4, 1861 Taken prisoner Salem Church 



Wounded First Bull Run 
Promoted to Major Dec. 12, 1861. 
Resigned Dec. 6, 1862, 



1861 
1861 
i36i 
1S62 
1861 



Promoted to Captain Dec. 16, t86r. 
Promoted to Captain Dec. 9, 1862. 
Promoted to Captain Dec. 16, 1862. 

Resigned Aueust 7. 1862. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 4, 1862 Wounded Gaines' Hill. 



l362 

1861 Promoted to Captain Dec. 17, 1862 
t362 

1 36 1 
i362 
1861 
186a 
1S63 
1S61 



Promoted to Captain Dec. 9, 1862. 

Wounded. 

Promoted to Captain April 5, 1862. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 24, 1863. Wounded. 



4. 

4, 
T 7. 

4. 

Q, 
*7, 

4. 

4. 

4, 

4, 

4, 
4, 
9. 
4. 
9, 

4, 
17. 

4, 
20, 

9. 

9. 

4> 

5, 

9. 
=4. 

4. 
*9. 

9. 
17, 

4. 
4, 

17, 



86 1 Promoted to First Lieut. July 4, 1S62. 



1861 
1862 
1862 
tSoi 
1862 

T362 

is6i 
1862 
1861 
1862 

1861 
1862 
1863 
1 86 1 
1862 
1 86 1 
1S02 
1861 
1S61 
1862 
iM ; 



1 be. 2 
1863 

1S61 
I ■' 1 
1862 

1 56 2 
. 

1862 
1S02 



Not Mustered. 

Resigned September 13, 1862. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 17, 1862. Wounded Salem Church 

Wounded Salem Church. 

Killed at Battle of Gaines' Mill, Va., June 27. 1S62. 

Discharged 1 let. 7, i3o2. 

Promoted to Lieut-Col. 98th regiment N.Y.V. August 9, 1862 

Died Aug. 8, 1862, of wounds received at Gaines' Hill. 



Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 4, 1S62. 
Promoted to Adjutant May 9, 1863. 



:eoi 
. - a 
[863 

1S61 

. • j 

l^CI 



Resigned Oct. 9. 1862. 

Killed at Salem Church. 

Promoted to Adjutant Sept. 24, 1861. Wounded Glendale 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 9, 1862. 

Not mustered as Second Lieut. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 5, 1862. 
Promoted to 1 irst Lieut. Dec. 9. 1 862. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 24 1803. 

Died of disease at Alexandria, Va., August 28, 1S61. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 9, 1862. 
Not mustered as Second Lieutenant. 

Promoted to First Lieutenant Oct. 4, 1S62. 
Promoted to First Lieutenant Dec. 17, 1862. 

Resigned June 21, 1861, 
Resigned rebruary 22, 1862. 
Resigned September 13, 1862, 

Resigned November to, iSot. 
Promoted to Captain Dec. 17, 1862. 



IT 



lOih Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



39 



REGIMENTAL BAND. 

The old " Frontier Band " of Potsdam, N. V., offered its services and was accepted 
by the Government May 2Sth, 1S61, but was mustered out of service Aug. Sth, 1S62, 
by general order of the War Department disbanding regimental bands, when several 
uf its members joined brigc.de bands or enlisted in the ranks of the Sixteenth. 

L. H. Parish, Leader. 

NAMES: 

Edward Baker, A. D. Palmer, N. S. K. Miles, 

II. G. Chandler, J. II. Thrall, Charles Sharp, 

A. Jerome, M. Vickery, W. E. Johnson, 

M. S. Knoules, M. Washburn, John Mc Donald, 

D. J. Meeker, J. D. Thrall, G. N. Spencer. 



ROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Co:$'Any A, Organized 
by David A. Nevin, at Ogdensburgh, St. Lawrence Co., in April, 1861. 






NAME Date of 

ISAM*,. muster in 

Captain : 

David A. Nevin May 15, 1861 

Isaac T. Merry July 18, 1S62 

Lieutenants: and May 22. 63 

O. B. Flagg Sept. 29, i3o2 

and May 22, 63 

Michael Cox March it, 1S63 

Peter L. Vanness May 15,1861 

Chas. L. Jones do 

Sergeants: and May 22, 63 

Chas. W. Huntington May 13,1861 

Isaac Doran do 

Fred. A. Butler do 

John L. Lyon do 

I lenry H. Wilson do 

Corporals: 

John Godden do 

Joseph Cowan do 

Francis Rearshaw do 

F.rskine C. Waterman do 

William Daniels May 15,1861 

Godden, George May 15,1861 

Musicians: 

William Bean do 

John H. Stafford do 

Privates: 

Alford, L N[ ay 27,1861 

Averi!!. David I. Oct. 15,1861 

Bans, John May 15,1861 

Pews, Alexander do 

Blair. James C do 

Brown, Elias C do 

Burgess, Thomas do 

Carter, John N. do 

Cater, John do 

Cavanaugh, Chas. do 

Colvin, John do 

Clements, James do 

Cornnell. Henry do 

r>ixon, Wm. A do 

Dempsey, Michael do 

Edgar, Benjamin do 

Elsworth, Dalos do 

Faneran, Alfred do 

Freehling, Leopold M do 

Green, Chas. S. do 

Morton, James E do 

Hill, Charles W do 

Hurley, James A. • do 



Remarks. 



(Mustered out May 22, 1863, when not otherwise stated.) 
Resigned July 20, 1862. 
Promoted from First Sergeant to First Lieut. Nov. 14, '61 ; 

promoted to Captain July 18, 1S62, by Governor S. N. Y. 
Promoted from First Serg. to First Lieut and entitled to pay 

from date of commission, September 29, 1862. 
Promoted from First Sergt. to Second Lieut. March ti, '63, 
Transferred and promoted to Capt. Co. I, 16th N. Y. Vols. 
Transferred and promoted to 1st Lt. Co. C, 16th N. Y. Vols. 

vice D. A. Nevin, promot. ; p'd as 1st serg. to Feb. 28, '63. 
Promot. from ranks to Sergt. Nov. n, '61, byord. Col. Davies. 
Promot. to Corp. Nov. n, '61, and to Sergt. Nov. 17, 1862. 
Promot. to Corp. Nov. ti, '61, and to Sergt. Sept. 29, 1862. 
Promot. to Corp. Nov. 26. '62, and to Sergt. Mar. 14, 1863. 
Discharged for disability. 

Promoted from the ranks November 20, 1862. 

Promoted from the ranks November 20, 1862. 

Promoted from the ranks September 29, 1862. 

Promoted from the ranks March 14, 1863. 

Transferred and promoted to Q. M. Sergt. 16th N. Y. Vols. 

Discharged on account of wounds received in battle. 



Detached on signal service December 24, 1861. 

For unexpired term of regiment; wounded at Salem Church. 



Wounded in action at bat. of Salem Church, Va., May 3, '63. 
Reduced from Sergeant to ranks November 20, 1862. 



Exchanged May 6, 1863; returned May 23, 1863. 

In parole, c'mp Annapolis; taken at Fredencksb. Dec.15,'62; 

returned May 23, '03. 
For unexpired term of regiment; wounded at Salem Church. 

Exchanged May 6, 1863; relumed May 23, 1863. 



4 o 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 




Johnson, James 

Mitchell, John A 

McClennan, John 

Payne, Charles A 

I'otts, William Oct. 

Ryan, Timothy May 

Reed, William Oct. 

Russell, Srephen May 

Simonds, Edward 

Service, Henry H 

Swnrtsriger, Joseph 

Sullivan, Michael 

Todd, James 

Tibbits, Hymen Sept. 

Wellar, Wm May 

Wright, Robert 

Doran, Samuel Sept. 

Griswold, Robert May 

Harnnetr, John April 

Hattie, James A... ^ept. 

Helmer, John >ept. 

Lafountain, Moses Aug. 

McCort, George >ept. 

,Reddincton. Henry Sept. 

Sitton, George Mar. 

Smith, John Feb. 

Smith, Philip Feb. 

Stark, Thomas H Sept. 

Shay, George Sept. 

Spaulding, Henry E May 

Tromblee, Joseph Nov. 

Willis, John Sept. 

Wetherly, Da\ id May 

Parlow, William Sept. 

Best, Isaac O Aug. 

Bartlett, Francis May 

Crowley, Dennis 

Fleming, Chas. C May 

Merry, Henry May 

Myers, Jos. 

Marcan, Simon 

Mitchell, John 

McBroom, Samuel 

M arror, G'ode Oct. 

Nowland, Peter May 

Paterson. Henry V. R 

Rose, Geo. S 

Ryan. John 

Smith, Chas. A 

Sargent, James Oct. 

Trickey, Henry C May 

Falon, James 

Goodness, Francis June 

Northrup, Levi S 

Ross, Thomas May 

While, George 

Fulton, Melvm 

Nowland, Joseph 

Pods, Joseph 

Pero, Michael 

Quagan, James 

Strong, David 

Steel, Wilber Oct. 

Van Valkenburgh, James 

Wall, James May 

Peterson, Win. W 



15. 

4, 

15, 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 



3 
15 
16 

15 

6 

29 

13 

10 

6 

15 

1; 
26 
22 
15 
16 
15 
15 
do 
30 

15 
do 
do 
do 
do 
3. 

*5> 
do 
do 
do 
do 

16, 

do 

'■4, 
do 



turned May 23, 1863. 
i86t In parole, camp Annapolis, Md. ; exchanged May 6, '63: re- 
iSbi Enlisted unexpired term of regiment. 
1861 Enlisted unexpired term of regiment. 

1861 



861 Enlisted for unexpired term of regiment. 

861 



862 
Sot 
862 
862 
862 
862 
862 
362 
862 
862 
862 
86 2 
862 
861 
862 
802 
861 
862 
861 
36 1 

861 
36 1 



1S61 
1 86 1 



1861 
1 86 1 



24 > 1 bo 1 



15. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

8, 
do 

15. 
do 



Transferred to i2tst N. V. Vols, by order General Brooks. 

Transferred to Co. I, 16th N. Y. Vols., July n, 1861. 

Transferred to 121st N. Y. Vols, by order Genera! Brooks. 

Transferred to 121st N. Y. Vols, by order Genera! Crooks. 

Transferred to 121st N. Y. Vols, by order Genera! Brooks. 

Transferred to 121st N. Y. Vols, by order General Brooks. 

Transferred to 121st X. Y. Vols, by order General Brooks. 

Transferred to 121st X. Y. Vols, by order General Brooks. 

Transferred to 121st X. Y. Vols, by order General Brooks. 

Transferred to 121st New York Volunteers. 

Transferred to 121st New York Volunteers. 

Transferred to 121st Xew York Volunteers. 

Transferred to 121st Xew York Volunteers. 

Promoted to Ouartermaster's Serceant July 22, 1862. 

Transferred to 121st Xew York Volunteers. 

Transferred to 121st Xew York Volunteers. 

Transferred to Company C, 16th Xew York Volunteers. 

Transferred to 121st Xew York Volunteers. 

Transferred to 121st Xew York Volunteers. 

Discharged on writ habeas corpus. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged on account of wounds received in battle. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged on account of wounds received in action. 

Discharged on account of wounds received in action. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Discharged for disability. 

Died of wounds received in action. 

Died from disease contracted in service. 

Died of wounds received in action. 

Died from disease contracted in service. 

Died of wound received in action at Salem Church. 

Failed to report at expiration of furlough. 

1 



1S61 
iSor 



Missing. 



Dropped from the rolls by stneral orders. 



,y\ 



16th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



*3 



ROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Company C, Organized 
by Frank Palmer, at Plattsburgh, Clinton Co., in April, 1S61. 



NAME. 



Date of 
muster in. 




Captain: 
Pliny Moore Aug. 

Lieutenants: 

Charles S. Jones 

Ira W. Hare July 

Serjeants: 

George S. Corbin May 

Barnice Washburn 

David S. Meader 

John H. Moffat j 

Corporals: 

Melvin Tucker May 

Edward McCarty 

Silas W. Cochran \ 

John V. Howes j 

Chas. Lucas 

Andrew Power Sept. 

Rufus Robinson May 

Mitchel Bully \ 

Musician: 
Augustus McCoy.. i 

Privates : 

Bedel, Jacob 

Banker, Charles R. > 

Bowen, Brainard 

Bullis, Leonard C Sept. 

Chappel, Clark May 

Clark, John 

Collins, George W Sept. 

Crary, Louis H Sept. 

Douney, Lorenzo Sept. 

Dorr, William Sept. 

Felton, John H Sept. 

Gough, James Sept. 

Garraw, John May 

King, Alexander 

Loraine, Michael 

Larock, Peter Sept. 

Marshall, George A May 

Puttran, Joseph 

Ruger, Jacob 

Ryan, Richard 

Sivey, George W Sept. 

Sargent, Francis H May 

Thompson, William 

Varno, James H 

Watson, Winston C 

Webb, Richard O June 

Winslow, Ed Sept. 

Peter F. Burdick, Sergt May 

Parkman D. Chappel, Corp. . 

John Ford , Corp 

Robert I . Lucas, Corp Sept. 

Armstrong, James May 

Bushor, Camile Sept. 

Cantield, Joseph W May 

Cubley. Edwin I 

Cross, Lewis Sept. 

Flanders, Ira ^.ug. 

Grant, William May 

Gencher, Ansel W . . Sept. 

Hayes, John B • May 

Henry, Patrick 

Hare, John..-.. Aug. 

Lapam, John Sept. 

McCarty, John.... May 

Matthews, John 

Ostrander, Israel 

Pike. Sands N 

Ryan, Patrick Sept. 

Smith, Edwin May 



7, 1S62 



(Mustered out May 22, 1S63, when not otherwise stated.) 
Promoted from Ensign to Captain. 



do (Transferred from Co. A; promoted from Ensign to 1st Lt. 

14, 1S62 Promoted from Sergeant to Ensign. 

15, itioiiPromoted to be Sergeant, thence to 1st Sergt. Jan. 11, 1863. 
do Promoted to be Sergeant Aug. 19, 1861. 

do [Promoted to be Sergeant Oct. 16, 1862 

do Promoted to be Sergeant July 14, 1862. 

15, 1861 Promoted to be Corporal. 

do ; Promoted to be Corporal; wounded at Salem Heights, Va. 

do j Promoted to be Corporal. 

do Promoted to be Corporal; mustered out August 24, 1863; 

wounded at Salem Heights, Va. 
do 'Promoted to be Corporal. 

27, 1S62 Promoted to be Corporal. 

15, 1S61. Wounded at Salem Heights. 
do 

do 



do 
do 
do 

16, 

do 

21, 

;o, 



3» 



I', 

9. 

23. 

"3. 
1 

do 

do 

28, 

*5, 

do 

do 

do 
21, 
15. 

do 

do 

do 
20, 
26, 

15. 
do 
do 

24. 
15. 
15. 
15. 

do 

15. 
*5. 
i5. 
10, 
15, 

do 
to, 
2 7, 
15. 

do 

do 

do 
27, 
IS. 



186T 

i86i| 

i86i| 

i£6i * 

1861 Wounded at Salem Heights, Va.; mustered out June 4, 1863 

1S61; 
t36i 
1861! 
18611 



1 So i Detailed to attend Lieut.-Col. Palmer, wounded. 
1861 



tSoi! 
iS6r 



! Wounded at Salem Heights, Va. ; must'd out June 17, 1863 



iS6iiMustered out June 20, 1863. 

1 861 j 
1S61 ") 



1 861 

1 So 1 
iSci 
1861 

1S61 
1862 
1F61 }■ Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 

1S61 I 
1S01 I 

1862 I 
1S61 

1S61 



1861 
iSoi J 



42 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 



NAME Date of Remarks. 

' ' ' commission. 

Folsom, Frank H do Discharged for Disability Kcbruary 8, i362. 

Fuller, Nelson do Discharged for Disability December 19, 1861. 

Follett, Martin G. do 

Ford, John do Discharged for Disability December to, 1S62. 

Fifidd, Charles C Sept. 50, i36i Discharged for Disability May 20, 1S62. 

Freeman, John R do 

Goodrich, Isaac May 15, i86t 

Gladdin, I onng do 

Grennan, Miles do 

Grennan, Francis do Killed at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862. 

Grennaa, William H do Discharged for Disability June 4, 1861. 

Guttledge, George Aug. 23, i86t Transferred to 12.1st Regt. N. Y. V. 

Hume, William May 15, 1861 

H utchins, Bradley G do 

Hancock, Isaac Sept. 27, 1861 Discharged for Disability November 22, 1862. 

Huse, Danie! Oct. 2, 1861 Discharged for Disability November 29, 1862. 

Healey, Hasia V do Died in Hospital November 25, 1861. 

Hard, Thomas W do Transferred to :21st Regt. N. V. V. 

Heaton, Charles 1 do Discharged for Disability May 30, 1862. 

King, O. B. May 15, 1861 Discharged for Disability January 26, 1862. 

Kennedy, David W Aug. 19, 1862 Discharged for Disability January n, 1863. 

Larock, Norbut Oct. 7. "-Soi Transferred to 121st Kegt. X. Y. V. 

Laughlic, John Oct. 9, 1861 Transferred to tsxst Kegt. N. Y. V. 

LaMere, Octave May 15, t36i 

LaYine, Nelson do Discharged for Disability June 5, 1861. 

Leet, Horace Aug. 22, 1862 Transferred to 121 Regt. N. Y. V. 

Marden, Hector M May 15, 1861 Discharged for Disability September, 20, 1862. 

Marden, Silas Oct. n, 1861 Discharged for Disability October 2, 1861. 

Marden, Hart. May 15, 1861 Discharged for Disability August 11, 1S62 

Morton, Calvin do .Missing December 15. iS 1 *^. 

McFee, Alexander do Discharged for Disability ; Wounded at Gaines' Mills Janu- 

; ary 19, 1263. 

Morton, Harrison June 24, 1861 

McCumber, Adolphus Sept. 30, 1861 Killed at Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. 

Marden, Jackson Aug. 20, 1S62 Transferred to 121st Regt. N. Y. V. 

Morton, Henry F Aug. 25, 1S62 Transferred to 121st Regt. N. Y. V. 

Nesbit, Matthew May 15, 1801 

Noble, Alexander do AYounded at Anteitam. 

Page, Orlando B ^ do J27, 1S62. 

Perry, Sherman C do 'Wounded at Gaines' Mill: Discharged for Disability June 

Perry, Joseph do W unded at Gaines' M ill: Discharged for Disability Octo- 

Packard, Truman do > Died in Camp F ranklm, November 19, 1S61. [ ber 22, 1S62. 

Powell, Julius H do Wounded at Gaines' Mill; Discharged for Disability June 

Patterson, Abram do .Discharged for Disability, June 5, i36i. [27,1862. 

Parker, John F do Discharged for Disaabiliiy ; Wounded at Gaines Mill April 

Perkins, Leonard B do 4,1863. 

Parody, Frank do 

Parody, Henry Sept. 30, 1S61 

Parmeter, Lucian M do Discharged for Disability October 30, 1862. 

Raymond, Horace H May 15, 1801 " 3 9 ' 

Seaver, Orson D do 

Sprague, Persho B do 

Sprague, Elaktm Oct. 30, 1861 Killed at Gaines' Mill Tune 27, 1862. 

Smith, Abraham May 15, 1S01 Discharged for Disabilty June 4, 1S61. 

Smith, William A do Wounded at Gaines Mill; Discharged for Disability June 

Sargent, Jfaroes A. do 27,1862. 

Smith, Edwin B Oct. 14, 1861 Discharged for Disbility February 19, 1863. 

Traver, Peter May 15. tS6ti 

Tilley, Hiram H do do do June 4, 1S61. 

Thompson, W i'.iiam W Sept. 27, tSoi Wounded at Gaines' Mill and Salem Church. 

Trumble, Harry W Oct. r, 1861 

Tenney, Darwin do 

Traver. John D Oct. 2:, 1861 

Thrall, Joseph D do Transferred to Band. 

Thrall, Jason 11 Sept. 2^, 1 5^1 Discharge.! !\>r Disability August 9, 1862. 

Vallter, Edward June 24, toot 

Wood, Lucian F M-y 22, i$< : D:^hjrced f->r Disability January 11, 1863. 

Wilson, William N <fo M iwn;; September 9, 1862. 

Warder., Cb :rirs Oct. 3, tS6i Killed at Gaines* Mill June 27, 1862. 



46 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 



NAME. 



Date of 
Mustered in. 



Remarks. 



Skinner, James B Sept. 

Thayer, John Sr May 

Thayer, John Jr Sept. 

Fair, Robert May 

Thayer, Alfred Sept. 

Wood, Virgil () May 

Whitford, Sidney 

Brown, Thomas June 

Jenne, Thomas A Aug. 

Lamohear, Joseph W 

Hicks, Wm. J May 

VVarnock, Robert A Inly 

Wm. W. Hutton May 

Andrew J. Lee Oct. 

Samuel M. Whitney May 

Charles H. Conant 

James H. Robertson 

Charles M. Smith j 

Adams, William j 



Burr, Soloman 
Barnes, Edwin H 

Brown, Thomas June 

Fredenburgh, John S May 

Gole, Henry R 

Johnson, D. Ward j 

Jones, David | 

Jones, John ! 

Lashbrooke, George A 

Northrop, George H I 

McClellan, Madison ! 

Leach, William Sept. 

Pulford, John Aug. 

Pettis, Miles. May 

Rice, Joel C Oct. 

Scot, Edward K \ May 

Van Orman, G. Myron ' 

Babcock, George M ! 

Dowzey, Richard H j 

Gore, John H j 

Hines, Herman ' 

Jones, Wm R Oct. 

Jenne, Chancy R Aug. 

Mitcheol, James M May 

Truman Perrizo 

Thayer, William 

Wiers, Wm. H 

Maxam, Luther Oct. 

Valentine, John Sept. 



1S61 
i36r 
i86t 
1861 
1S61 
1861 

1S61 
1862 

1861 
1 861 

1861 
i86t 
1861 



ax, 

15. 
27. 

15. 
19. 

do 

24i 

33, 

do 
is, 
1, 

i5» 
1, 

15. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

24, 

i5» 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

3°. 
20, 

13. 

2, 

i5» 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

8, 1861 



1861 

1861 



1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 



28, 

IS, 
do 
do 
do 
2, 

26, 



1S02 
i86t 



1861 
1S61 



Discharged, wounds received Gaines' Mill. 
Discharged, surgeons certificate disability. 
do do 

do do 

Discharged, wounds received Gaines' Hill. 
Discharged, surgeons certificate disability. 

do do 

Transferred from Company G to Company D. 
do to Battery A, First Mass. Artillery. 

do do do 

do from Company G to Company D. 

Promotid to be Regt. Commissary Sergt. 
Died from wounds rec*d Crampton's Pass. 

do do do 

Died of typhoid fever at Alexandria, Va. 
Killed battle Crampton's Pass, Md. 
Died wounds ree'd do do 

Died in hospi'.al near Sharpsburg, Md. 
Killed battle Salem Heights, Va. 

do Games' Mill, Va. 

Died wounds ree'd do 
Killed battle Crampton's Pass, Md. 

do do 

Died Belle Plain, Va. 
Died Alexandria, Va. 
Died White Oak Church, Va. 
Died Alexandria, Va. 
Died Philadelphia. 
Wounded battle Salem Heights, Va., reported dead but 

taken prisoner and paroled. Mustered, May 23, 1863. 
Died Washington, D. C. 
Died Hagerstown, Md. 
Killed battle Crampton Pass, Md. 
Died at Bakersville, Md. 
Died Alexandria, Va. 
Died Newark, N. J. 
Killed battle Crampton Pass, Md. 
Missing Alexandria, Va. 

do Mechamcsville, Va. 
do do 

do do 

do Catletts Station, Va. 
do White Oak Church, Va. 
do Alexandria, Va. 
do do 

do do 

do Keedysville, Md. 
Dropped from the rolls, 
do do 



1 6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



47 



ROSTER of Non-Com missioned Officers and Men of Company E, Organized 
by John L. Stetson, at Platts burgh, Clinton Co., in April, 1861. 




Remarks. 



Captain: 

John L. Stetson .May 

Ransom M. Pierce 

Albert Barney 

Charles H. Bently Jan. 

Lieutenants: 
Asaph Dodge : 



Higby 



Leonard J. Pierce . 
Peter La Fountain . 
Sergeants: 

George Stave 

Lewis M. Somers . 

Edwin Bates 

Henry W. Webber. 
Hiram F. 
Corporals: 

John Kavanaugh 

Stephen Tucker 

Solomon Prindle 

Wolford N. Stave 

Jacob Grant 

Cy rus Ward 

Albert Case 

Harvey Myers 

James S. Norcross 

Privates: 

Apps, William "R 

Amoor, Peter 

Amoor, Vetel 

Bully, Joseph 

Boolier, Michael 

Christian, James 

Connors, Eugene 

Cartwnght, Edw. W. . . . 

Cochran, Alonzo A. ... 

Dawson, John A 

Fonnier, Charles 

Gregory, Andrew 

Hurley, Michael 

Howe, Seymore N 

Hays, Matthew 

Hays, James 

Harris, David 

King, Eledore 

Labrick , Peter 

Lane, William M 

Lezott, Henry C 

Ladebouche, Alexander. 

Murray, John 

Moffatt, Patrick 

Meyett, Peter 

Myers, Joseph 

Murphy, James \ 

Monty, Benjamin 

McLane, Cc melius 

McAuliff, Richard 

Palmer, William 

Peck, William M 

Poland, Antoine 

Roberts, Joseph 

Stephens, Albert 

Sullivan, John 

Webb, Melancton B. ... 

Young, Charles 

Akey, William 

Bennett, Silas W 



May 
May 



Aug. 

'Oct. 
May 



15, '61 Promoted to Lieut. -Col. 59th regt. N. Y. Vols. 
do Discharged on account of disability. 

do Promot. to Capt. Co.D; thence to Colonel 142nd. 

21, '63 Promoted to First Lieut, from Ensign; thence to Captain. 

do Promoted from First Sergeant Co. F, to Ensign Co. E; 

thence to First Lieut, 
do Promoted from Secor-.d Sergt. to Ensign. 

15, '61 Promot. from 1st Sergt. to Ensign; thence to 1st Lt. Co. H. 

15, '61 Promoted from Second Sergt. to First Sergt. 
do Promoted from Second Corp. to Fourth Sergt. 

do Killed at battle of Salem Church, Virginia. 

do Dropped from the roll. 

15, 1862 Missing since battle of Salem Church, Va. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



28, '61 Discharged for disability. 
15, '61 Discharged for disability. 
,1 



} Promoted to Corporal. 



|Oct. 

'May 



3 1 . ' 6l J 



Oct. 
Oct. 
May 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1, 



do 
do 
do 



24, 
28, 

15. 



'61 To be stopped by sentence General Court Martial, 
do do do 

In General Hospital, Washington, D. C. 



'61 

'61 In hospital, Washington; an invalid since Sept. 4, '62. 



In General Hospital, Washington. 



Sept. 27, '6i 



Oct. 
May 



do 



22, '61 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



15. ° r In General Hospital, Washington. 



Brooks, William W. . 
Broad well, Andrew J. 
Bradford, George W. . 
Cross, John F. ..... .. 

Charraw, Lewis ..... 

Cline, Ethan , 



Aug. 
May 
Sep't. 
May 
Sept. 
May 
Sent. 
Aug. 



25. 

15. 
23. 

7, 
*!>» 

27 » 



'6a Discharged 
'61 Discharged 
'6i Discharged 
'61 Discharged 
'61 Discharged 
'61 Discharged 
'62 Discharged 
*C2 Discharged 



for disability, 
for disability, 
for disability. 
for disability, 
for disability, 
for disability, 
for disability, 
for disability. 



16th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



49 



y 



ROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Company F, Organized 
by John C. Gilmore, at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., in April, 1861. 



NAME. 



Date of 
commission. ; 



Remarks. 



Captain: 

Henry T. Sanford 

Lieutenants: 

John A. Vance 

Wm. R. Helms 

Sergeant-,: 

Smith S. Thomas. 

David G. Fuller.... 

Efick Bangle 

Henry Brown 

Timothy Farrell 

Corporals: 

Allan A. Givin 

James Allen 

Cyrus R. Mone 

Wm. Adams 

Musicians: 

John Dyk 

John Crowley 

Privates : 

Abbott, Sylvester 

Allen, Wm. D 

Bruce, Joseph E 

Butterfield, John W 

Bruce, Samuel G 

Cardinal, Joseoh 

Day, William W 

Ellison, Leander 

Gladden, Alonzo L 

Gladden, Leorin 

Goodcourage, William....... 

Griswold, Robert 

Griswold, Reuben 

Hodgkins, Charles H 

Howard, Lyman. 

Hodges, Zimrei 

Harvey, William 

Harvey, Colvin 

Holbrook, Edward 

Helms, Henry M 

Kellerson , Andrew 

Lalondi, Joshua 

Matthews, Ransom 

Roach, David 

Sharp, Joseph 

Stevens, Sidney 

Sanford, Erasmus J 

Trudell. Frank 

Webb, James 

Wait, Martin. 

Walker, Francis 

Witherell. George R. 

Holaday, Bliss, Serg't 

Cook, James Corporal 

Woodward, I liram J., Corp'l. 

Adams, John 

Browne!!, George C 

Brown, Samuel 

Barnhart, Ale vander 

Crossman, Eigar 

Ccpeland, Edward 

Devlin. Isaac 

Dave, Henry 

Edward, Soloman 

Erwin, Warren J 

Foster, Charles - • • 

Garsan, Charles F 

Hodges, Nathan 

Helms, Julius J 

Holaday, Henry 

Hammond, Hiram 

Hale, Charles 



(Mustered out May 22, 1863, when not otherwise stated I 
Feb. xi, 1S63 Promoted from 1st Serg't to 2nd Lieut., ihence to Captain. 



Nov. 
May 



May 



Oct. 
Oct. 
May 



July 
May 



la. 

it. 



May 
Feb. 

^y 15, 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
Oct. 14, 
May 15, 

do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



s\ 1S61 



1S63 Promoted from Sergeant to 2nd Lieutenant. 

1 

1S61 In Hospital, at Washington, D. C. 

Promoted to Corporal, thence to Sergeant. 
do do do do 

do do do d» 

do do do do 



1S61 
1861 



do 

do 
do 

do 



do 
do 
do 
do 



In Hospital at Washington, D. C. 



Sept. 
May 



*5> 

do 

1, 

do 
do 
June 27, 



15. 

do 

do 

7. 
26. 



1S61; 
i86t ; 
I 
1862! 
1861J 



1861! 

1861 



1 861 
t 86 1 



*3, 

do 
do 
do 
do 
15, 
15. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
March 30, 
Aug. 23, 

July 5. 

March 27, 
May is, 
Sept. 2, 
May 15, 

do 
April 1, 



5, 1S01 Discharged of wound received at Gaines' Kill. 



1861' 
i36i 



iSoa 

1 3*2 

1 So 1 
1862 
1 36 1 
1S61 
1861 

1S63 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do do West Point, 

on Surgeons Certificate. 

do do 

of wound received at West Point^ J 



5° 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 



\ 



NAME. 




Gris, Charles May 15, 1861 

Kelley, Levi ^ do 

Murray, Randall — ." Sept. 12, 1861 

Olmstcad, Pomeroy Nov. 9, t86i 

O'Neal, .Michael Aug. 28, i362 

Rust, Hiram Sept. 2, 1861 

Richards, Dennis May 15, 1S61 

Ranco, Edward Feb. 5,18^2 

Sweeney, Michael Feb. 4, 1S62 

Yarnsworth, Mark July 5, 1S61 

Dodge, Asaph ('.), Sergt May 15, i86x 

Adams. Charles E Aug. 26, 1862, 

Austin, Oliver Aug. 50, 1862 

Austin, Thomas Aug. 29,1862 

Allen, George Sept. 2, 1862 

Benedict, Constant Sept. 5,1862' 

Dearth, Joseph Sept. 10,1862; 

Durrell, Enoch W Aug. 26, 1862 

Dennick, N Aug. 28, 1862; 

Flanders, Otis B ( do 

Foot, Williard P Aug. 29,1862 

Fulton, James M May 15, 1861 

Hamlin, J. M Aug. 26,1862 

Johnson, Charles W Aug. 30,1862] 

Love, Horace E Aug. 28, 1862' 

Lamb, Joseph D ! do 

McCurry, James II Aug. 26, 1862; 

Norris, Joseph B Aug. 13,1862' 

Shaw, John Aug. 29, 1862 

Say les, Ambrose, Serg't Aug. 26,1862' 

Adams, Henry H., Corporal.. May 15, 1861I 

Erwtn, Warner J do 

Lave, George J j do 

Butler, Loren j do 

Burdock, James D I do 

Bishop, Erwin R j do 

Cunningham, Silas N ] do 

Crossman, Edward j do 

Frary, David j do 

Richards, James j do 

Shahs, Robert J j do 

Thornton, Marshal \ March 17, 18^2; 

Woodward, Eland A ] \\ ay 15, 1861 

Washburn. Henry C I do 

Potter, Lutheron 1 do 

Ploof, Peter G j do 

Austin, Oliver | do 

Braddick, Lazal Aug. 29,1862! 

Durkes, Joseph C |Aug. 28,1862 

McCurry, Wellsly, Corporal.. jOct. 3, 1861 

Shauuck, Wilhs Aug. 13,1862, 

Ansted, Charles W May 15, i§6ii 

Buck, Jeremiah B Sept. 13,1862 

Barnhart, Ehas Sept. 30,1861 

McCloud, William B Sept. i, 1862 

Shaughnessy, Daniel , May 15, i8ei 

Gilmour, John C t j do 

Hoibrook, Joseph, Lieut | do 



Discharged on Surgeons Certificate. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Promoted and transferred to Company E 16th N. Y. S. V. 
Transferred to :21st N. Y. S. V. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



to Company " G " 16th N. Y. S. V. 
to 121st N. Y. S. V. 
do 
do 
do 
- do 
do 
do 
do 
Died of Typhoid Fever. 

do do 

Killed at West Point in action. 
Died of Disease. 
Killed at Crampton Pass, Md. 
do West Point, Va 
do Crompton Pass, Md. 
Died of Typhoid Fever, 
do Measles. 

do wound received at Crampton Pass, Md. 
Killed at Malvern Hills. 
do Gaines' i fills. 
do Charles City Cross Roads, 
do Crampton Pass, Md. 
Died at Washington, D. C. 
Killed at Battle of West Point. 
Died at Georgetown, D. C. 
Missing in action near Fredericksburg, Va. 
do do do 

do . do do 

do do do 

Missing. 
do 
do 
do 
do 

Promoted to Major of 16th N. Y. S. V. 
[ 'ioJ ol l>l>t_a-c. 






m- 



l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



5* 



ROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Company G, Organized 
I by N. M. Curtis, at De Peystrr, St. Lawrence Co., in April, 1861. 



NAME. 



Date of 
muster in. 



Remarks. 



Captain. 
Best; William L Feb. 

Lieutenants. 

Bayne, Andrew C 

Austin, John II 

Sergeants. j 

Patridge, L. Lee May 

Johnson, Oflniore L 

Bishop, Julius 

Forsy the, George II | 

Russell, John F 

Corporals. 

Fieldson, Thomas j 

McCelvey, James 

Bostwick, Emerson j 

Eliot, George B ..| 

Privates. 

Adams, Anthony Oct. 

Betts, Edwin O May 

Blood, Charles L... , 

Baxter, Samuel ! 

Banker, John L j 

Benson, Amos \ 

Bantord, David ,..] 

Backus, David 

Benson, Valentine Oct. 

Chilton, Alexander A Oct. 

Coffin, Nelson, Jr Oct. 

Dempsey, Robert May 

Dalack, John 

Fieldson, William Oct. 

Fisher, Nathaniel Oct. 

Gallaway, George D July 

Heath, Francis P Oct. 

Haile, Alonzo 

Huckett, John May 

Hyde, Abel. Jr 

Jilson, Charles B..... 

Kennedy, Andrew 

Liscum, Rodolphus 

La Rou, Francis 

Maine, William 

Wills, Henry- 

O'Connor, John May 

Russell, David C, Jr Oct. 

Reed, Jones L Oct. 

Raven, George P 

Sempur, James May 

Stephens, Theodore H 

Washburn, James H 

W'estern, Joseph H. 

Barney, William, Sergt 

Austin, Daniel, Sergt 

Dean, Amos H 

Goodson, John, Corp 

M-rrit, Anson W., Corp Oct. 

Matoon, Vinson, Corp May 

KenotT, Jacob, Corp Aug. 

Bell, William H Oct. 

Ballentine, Hugh May 

Bey ran, Lewis 

Burnaham, Rollan 

Chilton, Thomas B Oct. 

Curtis, Thomas W May 

Chafee, James E Oct. 

Deaur, William H 

Dart, Maynard Oct. 

Earl, George May 

Fleetham, George H ■ 

Gore, William E 

Coodison, Benjamin 

Heulct Edwin H 



(Mustered out May 22, 1863, when not otherwise stated.; 
11, 1S63 Promoted from 2d Lieut, to 1st Lieut, thence to Captain. 



do 
do 



do Sergt. to 2d Lieut, thence to 1st Lieut, 

do Sergt. to 2d Lieut. 



15, 1S61 Wounded in action at Salem Heights, 

do Promoted from Private to Corp. thence to Sergt. 
do do Corp. to Sergt. 

do do Private to Corp. thence to Sergt. 

do do Private to Sergt. 



do 
do 
do 
do 

*5. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

7. 

T 9> 

=4, 

15. 

do 

14. 
=4. 
24. 
19. 
do 

15. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

17. 

2 9. 

2 4. 
do 

15. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

19. 

i5i 
2, 

16, 

1 

do 
do 

I9i 
15, 

do 

t9. 

*5» 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Promoted to Corporal, 
do 
do 
do 



1861 

1861 Wounded in action at Salem Heights. 



1 861 1 Wounded in action at Salem Heights. 

1S61 Reported missing at Salem Church, but joined Regiment. 

1 36 1 Dropped trom the roll, but aiterwards picked up. 

1861' 

1861' 
t86i 
1 So 1 
1S61 

1 861 



1 80 1 
1861 
1861 



1S61' Dropped from the roll, but afterwards picked up. 



Wounded in action at Salem Heights, Va. 

Promoted to Sergeant. 

1 



j> 



1861 

I 86 1; 

i86x 
1861I 

i36i! j 

1 861] 
1861; 
1S61: 

1861I 
1 So 1 



f Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 



5* 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 



JN-AME. xf D , atC 5 f - 

Mustered in 

Healy, James do 

Hill, Charles Oct. 19,1861 

King, George W May 15, iSot 

Keiliy, Robert do 

Murphy, James ' do 

McDonald, John do 

Parker, James do 

Patno, Ado'.phus do 

Poor, Charles Oct. 24, 1861 

Paran, Lewis May 15,1861 

Robinson, Francis Oct. 19,1861 

Simons, John May 15,1861 

Turner, Dena .1 do 

Wickwise, Charles I do 

Wells, Oliver Sept. 13.1861 

Wardell, Samuel May 15,1861 

Wallace, William do 

Brown, George do 

Gallaway. William K., Corp. Aug. 15, 1862 

Austin, William H Aug. 23, 1862 

Brooks, William W Sept. 23,1861 

Brown, Thomas June 24, 1S61 

Dart, Daniel Aug. 15, 1S62 

Feterley, Edward Sept. 2, 1862 

Grenie, Edward Aug. 23, 1862 

Hicks, William J May 15,1862 

Orlend, Rafield ; do 

Putnam. Thomas B do 

Phillips, Elisha A do 

Roberts. Joseph do 

Tate, Alexander ....June 5,1861 

Elsworth, Edwin T., Corp... May 15, 1S61 

Cassady, John Oct. 24, 1861 

Elsworth, Edward July 5, 1861 

Gardner, Charles H May 15,1861 

Grenia, Celester do 

Green, James Oct. 15, 1861 

Hyde, Freeman May 15,1861 

Humery, Francis Oct. 9,1861 

Matoon, James Oct. 11,1861 

Merril, James May 15,1861 

Parsons, Joseph do 

Pierce, Charles do 

Raven, Henry do 

Rolston, David Oct. iq, 1861 

Russell, Daniel E Oct. 26,1861 

Seabury, Cable Oct. 24,1861 

Thompson, John R July 5,1861 

Walker, Robert Oct. 19,1861 

Wonless, Georee W May 15,1861 

Waymouth, Wiiliam do 

Matoon. John Oct. 19, 1S61 

Lewis, Solomon do 

Barton, Lewis do 

Curtis, N. Martin May 15, 1S61 

Vedder, Simon C, Lieut do 



Remarks. 



^Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 



Transferred to 121st Regt. Vols. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
Co. E, 6th Regt. 
Co. D, do 
T2ist Regt. Vols, 
do 
do 
Co. D, 6th Regt. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Killed in action at Gaines' Mills, Va. 
Died of typhoid fever. 
Killed in action at Gaines' Mills' Va. 
Died of typhoid fever. 
Killed in action at Crampton Gap, Md. 
Died in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. 
Died in General Hospital, New York. 
Killed in action at West Point. 
8ur Died of typhoid fever. 
I >ied of diarrhoea. 

I Killed in action at Gaines' Mill, Va. 
iDied of wounds received in action. 
'Died of typhoid fever. 
Died 'date unknown) at Philadelphia, Pa. 
' Died of typhoid fever. 
Killed in action at West Point, Va. 
Died from disease. 
Died of chronic diorrhcea. 
Killed in action at Gaines' Hill, Va. 

do West Point, Va. 

Missing in action at Gaines' Hill, Va. 
; Missing. 
i do 

I Promoted from Capt. to Lieut. -Col of 42d Regt. Vols. 
I Discharged. 



l6th Regiment, N. K Volunteer Infantry. 



53 



ROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Company H, Organized 
by Warken Gibson, at Stockholm & Potsdam, St. Laurence Co., April, 1861. 



NAME. 



When 

mustered in. 




Captain: 
Wilson Hopkins Feb. 

Lieutenants: 

Nel>on Z. Cozzens. 

Charles A. Brown Sept. 

Sergeants: 

Oren W. Elmore May 

J.unes M. Hamilton 

David J. Lewis.. 

Roswel! B. Coon 

James F. Breckenridge I 

Corporals: 

Leroy B. ( )>good 

Rufus Walston 

Joe! P. Moses Oct. 

Harris R. Durkee May 

Musician: 
Clark H. Sumner i 

Privates: 

Brining, John j 

Collins, Daniel 

Corbin, Cassius R 

Converse, Jeremiah P 

Elridge, Orin W 

Finch, William H 

Graves, Ira R 

Hayes, James ~... 

Heath, Samuel Sept. 

Kennon, Henry July 

Lauber, Nelson May 

Locke, Andrew J 

M agin, Laughlin F • 

Miller, Cornelius 

Norton, William W 

Pelsue, Newell C 

Pierce, James 

Page, Lorenzo Oct. 

Strong, George VV May 

Spears, Charles W 

Sails, Daniel 

Trussell, Nelson L ....! 

Wright. George A. 

Wallcott, Willard J ! 

Wilkins, Ephriam 

Wilkins, Riley E 

Kimberly, Alexander D ' 

Warren W. Gibson, Captain. 

Peter Lafountain, Lieut June 

Archibald Tucker, Lieut May 

Samuel Webster. Lieut 

Frank H. Hamilton, Lieut... 

Francis Clark, Serg't May 

Francis Engiehart, Serg't.... June 

Adams, Lorenzo May 

Allen, Cyrus M Sept. 

Bush, Joseph May 

Berry, Charies H 

Bedel, Earl | 

Bigelow, Isaac A Sept. 

Bradley, Chester A May 

Brown, George M 

Cruikshank, Hugh, Jr 

Coon, Jothan i 

Daud, Bailey Oct. 

Edwards, George May 

Fulsom, Henry C ( >ct. 

Hulburt, Darwin May 

GalTney, Barney 

Heath, Benjamin Sept. 

Hoit, Uriah Oct. 

Irish, Carter D May 

Lacowise, Jacob ....' 



(Mustered out May 22nd, 1863, when not otherwise stated.; 
ir, iS62 : Promoted from First-Lieut. Co. " B." to Captain 

•d j Promoted from Serg't to First-Lieut. 

3, iS6i;In detached service in charge of printing department. 



do 
do 
do 

do 

do 
do 

14. 

*5, 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
12, 

1 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
13, 

15. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
27, 
I 5, 

do 

do 
r 5» 
*4. 



18'' 1 Promoted from Serg't to First-Lieut. 
do Corporal to Serg't. 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

Promoted from Private to Corporal, 
do do do 

1 861! do do do 

:8oi Dropped from Co. rolls. 



Dropped from Company rolls, 
do do 

do do 



3» 



1S61 
1 86 1 

i36i 






Missing in action at Salem Church, Va. 



1801 Wounded and missing in action. 
Missing in action.j 



Missing in action at Salem Church. 

'Wounded in action at Gaines Hill. 
1S62 Resigned. 
1 861 

Promoted to Second-Lieut, and resigned. 
Resigned. 
1S61 Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 
1 S61 Wounded in action. Discharged. 



12, 


1 ho i 


I>. 


1S01 


do 




do 




12, 


tS6i 


IS. 


1S61 


do 




CO 




do 




15. 


1S61 


*5. 


1 36 1 


g 


iSoi 


15, 


1861 


CO 




12, 


1S62 


2t, 


iSot 


15, 


1861 


do 





> Discharged from U. S. Service. 



54 



Roster a fid Record of the Officers and Men, 



NAME. 



When 
Mustered in. 



Remarks. 



McCuen, Nelson do 

Merrill, Willis do 

Merrill, William H ^ept. 5, 1862 

Ross, Roswell May 15,1861 

Blackwood, Levi ' do 

Reynolds, James | do 

Sartwell, L-evi i do 

Sharp, Henry do 

Sails, Samuel Oct. 14,1861 I 

Stearns, Sidney S May 15, 1S61 j 

Smith, Marshall \V Aug. 22, 1S62 j 

Thayer, Moses A May 15,1861 

Wilkins, George L do 

Webster, Luman Oct. 21, 

Crocker, Jedediah Aug. 29, 

Donivan, Andrew ; do 

Hutchinson, Cyrus B | do 

King, Adolphus Jan. 31, 1862 

Murray, Horace..... Sept. 9, 1862 

Mills, Alexander ^ug. 3», 1862 

Nicholson, Peter Sept. 10, 1S62 

O' Brine, John Jan. 31, 1S62 

Shufelt, Edwin Sept. 18, 1S62 

Alanson Barnard, Lieut May 15,1861 

William Now land, Serg't. ... do 

James Gurley, Corporal do 

David McAilaster, Corporal.. do 

Peveril P. Page do 

Bell, John... do 

Cooper, Orvilie do 

Daniels, Martin. do 

Downey, Robert S ....! do 

Gillchrist, James do 

Hammond, William do 

Haywood, Eben A do 

Haggarty, Edward Mrch. 26, 1862 

Lewis, Rufus E Aug. 20, 1862 

Marsh, Joel M May 13, 1861 

Magin, John Oct. 12, 1S61 

Murray, Orman. Sept. 12,1862 

Nowland, Thomas Oct. 21, 1S61 

Runnion, John May 15, 1861 

Richards, Hiram S do 

Russell, Isaac A do 

Reed, Stephen L do 

Stores, Henry D do 

Smith, George E do 

Wilkins, William H Sept. S, 1862 

Blatchley, Lorenzo P Sept. 17, 1862 

Carpenter, Winneld S Sept. 24,1862 

Rvan, John Nov. 19, 1861 

Simmonds, Daniel May 15, 1861 

Rivers, Isaac G. May 15,1861 



■ Discharged from U. 8. Service. 



x86i . 

1862 Transferred to 2nd L T . S. Artillery. 
do 121st N. Y. S. V. 

do 2nd U. S. Artillery. 

do do do 

do 1 21 st N. Y. S. V. 

do do do 

do 2nd U. S. Artillery. 

do do do 

do 121st N. Y. S. V. 

Killed in action at Gaines Hill. 

do Crampton Pass, Md. 

Died in General Hospital at Fortress Monroe, Md. 

do West Philadelphia. 

Killed in action at Salem Church. 
Killed in action at Gaines Hill. 

do Crampton Pass. 

Died in General Hospirai, Albany, N. Y. 
Died in action at Gaines Mill. 
Killed in action at Gaines Hill. 

do Crampton Pass. 

Died in Genera! Hospital, Alexandria, Va. 
do do 

do at Potomac Creek, Va. 
do in Brigade Hospital, Alexandria, Va. 
Killed in action at Crampton Pass, Md. 

do Salem Church, Va. 

Died at Brigade Hospital, Alexandria, Va. 
do do 

do do 

do do 

Died at Harrison's Landing, Va. 
Killed in action at Salem Church, Va. 
Died in General Hospital at Fortress Monroe, Va. 
Killed in action at Salem Church, Va. 
Missing from camp at While Oak Church, Va. 
do do do 

do do Alexandria, Va. 

do from Washington, D. C. 
Never mustered into service. 



l6th Regiment, N. Y. Volunteer Infantry. 



55 



"ROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Company I, Organized 
by Joel J. Seaver, at Malone, Franklin Co., in April, 1S61. 



NAME. 



Date of 
muster in. 



Remarks. 



Captain: 
Charles M. Hilliker ! Feb. 

Lieutenants: 

Samuel W. Gteason Nov. 

Enos Hinman , Feb, 

Serjeants: 



'■ (Mustered out May 22, 1863, when not otherwise stated. ) 
xx, 1863 Promoted from Sergeant to Ensign; thence to Captain. 



8, 1S62! do 
11, 1S63 do 



do do First Lieutenant, 
do do Ensiga. 



Rupill J. Cunnigham. 



July 



5. 
15. 

do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 



15. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

5: 
*3> 

do 
do 
do 
do 
5> 
*5j 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

5» 
do 



1861 



Timothy B. Juermix \lay 

Swift B. Smith 

William J. Murray 

George Fletcher 

Corporals: 
William H. D. Lord .... 

Silas W. Hatch 

Henry H. Ellis 

Dennis N. Fish !Oct. 5, 1861 

Privates: 

Amidon, Marshal (May 

Baker, Hiram 

Bassett, Sylvanus 

Barber, William W 

Rugby, Charles W 

Bullis, Ezra S 

Bennett, Andrew 

Coyne, James 

Callahan, Martin....... 

Coates, George 

Carpenter, Frederick.... 

Everest, Byron 

Enright, John 

Gonier, Isaac 

Greeno, Charles L 

Hugaboom. Cornelius .. 

Hubbard, Ovro N 

Hatch, James B 

Kelly, Amaziah 

Lalime. Ensebe 

Lee, Willis 

Owens, Chauncey 

Phillip, Bently S [Oct, 

Robinson, John I May 

Sinclair, Albert M I 

Sullivan, Thomas j 

Stewart, Amherst j 

Tait, Alexander 1 

Van Hemo, Fredas C July 

Whitehouse, Thomas S May 

Wing, John j 

E. Allen Moore I 

Zebulon Bennett j 

Bagant P. Alexander i 

Horatio C. Powell Oct. 

Martin Reily May 

Bradford, Robert 

Bemis, Jonathan Oct. 

Babcock, John \ 

Bracy, John Sept. 

Conjer, Ambrose < >ct. 

Clifford, Richard May 

Fuller, Sidney j 

Gregory, William E J n 'y 

Grifrin, Alvin May 

Graves, Myron Sept. 

Milliard, Miner May 

Howlett, Thomas .......... 

Hunily, Myron 

Hoag, Thomas Oct. 

Huntington, Cornelius Sept. 

Harricha, Patrick Sept. 

Lynch. James Inly 

McDonald, William H "May 

McKeon, Thomas do 

NeiSdo, Joseph Oct. 5,iS6i 



xS6x Promoted to be Sergeant. 
iSoij do do do 
do do do 

j Wounded in action at Salem Church. 

Promoted to be Sergeant. 



Promoted to be Corporal. 

Taken prisoner near Salem Church. 

Wounded in action. 



Reduced from Corporal to Private. 
Wounded in action, 
do 



Wounded near Fredericksburg. 
Wounded in action. 

do 



1S61 

1861 



1801 

1 861 



do 
5. 
r 5i 

5, 
'5. 
do 
do 

5. 
2 7. 
20, 

5. 



186H 

1 86 1 

1861. 

1862 
t86i 

1861 
i 

1S61! 
1 861 

1 86 1 



1 861 

jSbt 
1861' 
1 86 1 
1S01 



Discharced 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



for disability. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 






56 



Roster and Record of the Officers and Men, 



NAME. 



Date of 
muster in. 



Parks, Albert 

Rollins, Samuel M 

Saucomb, Julius 

Smith, George \V 

Smith, Darwin E 

Shields, Timothy 

Tracy, Hugh 

Trefren, Nicl 

Weyms , David 

Whltton, Joseph 

Daniel boston, Fife Major.. 
Charles A. Brown. r-ergt . . 
Wilmont J. Berry, Corp .. 
Joseph H. Reynolds, Corp 

Bemis, Simeon E 

Beattz, Jasper A 

Clifford, Richard 

Carr, John S 

Carr, Henry 

Denio, Charles 

Edgerly, David 

Fulham, James 

Grant, Arthur M 

Garen, Michael 

Howell, Abram 

Hubbard, George 

Kelly, John 

Luther, Ransom C 

Laughreim, James 

McGuire, Patrick...^ 

Newstrae, William C 

Pilline, Abram 

Rupell. David C. J 

Rosa, Charles W 

Stafford. John H 

Saucomb, Louis 

Sa'linger, William 

Bapett, Asa 

Barnum, Albert 

Bermann , William 

Bigelow, Douglass C. 

Coteaw, Alexander 

Downs, Peter 

Ellis, Norman R 

Harric'na, Jasper..... 

Lukes, Erasmus 

McMillian, Daniel 

Raga, Oscar S. R 

Slattery, John 

Sylvester, Waiter W 

John C. Whitehouse, Corp . 

Fulsom, Luther 

Archumboult, Albert 

Armsbv, Thomas 

Bradford. Alfred 

Clark, William 

Farneff, Joseph 

Rogers, Levi 

Whitton, Woodbury 

Graves, Edward 

Joel J . Seaver, Capt 

Peter L. Van Nes, Capt .. 
Frederick F. Weed, Lieut.. 
Milton E. Robert, Lieut ... 



May 



Oct. 



May 

Oct. 
May 
Oct. 



Sept. 
iOct. 



May 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



Oct. 
May 



*5. 
do 
do 

do 

do 
do 



Oct. 

Sept. 

May 

Sept. 

.May 

Oct. 

Sept. 

May 



»ept. 

Sept. 
May 



July 
May 

June 

May 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

May 



1861 



1861 



Remarks. 



do 

5. 
*5. 

5, 
do 
do 
do 

5> 
do 

5> 
do 
do 
do 
do 
15. 
5. 
5, 
i>» 
16, 

5, 
do 
do 
5» 
5. 
*5, 
5, 
15. 
3> 
5> 
*5, 
do 
do 
do 

15, 

do 

do 

5> 
2, 

t5. 
do 
do 
5« 

I5> 
do 

i5> 
15. 

16, 

3. 

*5. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



5, 1861 



1861 

1 86 1 
1861 



1862 
1861 



1861 

1S62 
1861 
1S62 

1862 
1862 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Vols. 



i85i 

1862 
1S61 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 



1861 

t86i 



1S62 

1861 
1S61 



1 86 1 
i86t 

1861 
1861 
1 861 

iS^i 
1 86 1 
1S01 



Discharged for disability. 

Transferred to Company H, 16th N. Y. S. Vols. 

Transferred to 121st N. V. S. Vols. 

do do 

Transferred to i22st N. Y. S. 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

Transferred to 18th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols. 
Transferred to 121st Regiment N. Y. State Vols. 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

Transferred to Company G, 16th Regiment N. Y. S. Vols. 
Transferred to 121st Regiment N. Y. S. Volunteers. 
Transferred to Company A, roth Regiment N. Y. S. V. 
Transferred to 121st Regiment N. V. S. V. 

do do ' 

Killed in action at Salem Church. 
Died in Hospital at Alexandria, Va. 
Died in Hospital near Alexandria, Va. 
Killed in action at Salem Church. 
Died in Hospital near Alexandria, Va. 
do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

Killed in action at Salem Church, Va. 

do do do 

Died in Hospital at Alexandria, Va. 
Killed in action near Gaines' Hill, Va. 

do do 

do do 

do 
Missing. 
Missing. 

Dropped from the rolls. 
Dropped from the rolls. 
Dropped trom the rolls. 
Dropped from the roli>. 
Dropped from the rn'.Is. 

Vlissmg in action, Gaines' Hill: supposed dead. 
Promoted to Major of the 16th Regt. N. V. S. V. 
Resizned. 
do 
do 



i6th Regiment^ N. V. Volunteer Infantry 



57 



IROSTER of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of Company K, Organized 

by William W. Wood, at Mooers, Clinton Co., in Aprir, 1S61. 



NAME. 



When 
mustered in. 



Remarks. 



Captain: 
William VV. Woo, J .. 

Lieutenants: 
William ll.Jamisin. 
Henry J. Carlton.... 

Sergeants: 

Samuel Can n in 

Rufus S. Dodge 

Benjamin F. Jones... 
William A. Nichols.. 
Charles Grant 

Corporals: 
James Navil 



May 



Nov. 
May- 



Nathan Decker 

Privates: 

Albers, Albert 

Burdick, William 

Bruso, Akin 

Bromley, Marvin 

Carpenter, Erastus L... 

Cox, William 

Demaso, John 

Doty, Joseph 

Fitzpatrick, Michael.... 

Gonyea, Joseph 

Greene, William M 

Gonyea, Samuel 

Hewitt, Gideon R 

Jourdanis, Alfred 

Laplant, William H.... 

Lapoint, Gilbert 

Monty, Melvin 

Morris, Moses 

Mott, James. 

Merritt, Henry 

Mercrose, Franklin 

Nichols, John 

Potter, John 

Richey, Joseph, ]r 

Ricord, Julius 

Richey, William 

Renell, Lewis E 

Stafford, Seth 

Sartwell, Moses H 

Steel, Edgar W 

White, James 

Williams, James 

Woolf, W illiamW 

Aldridge, Philip 

Baldwin, George 

Barmaby, Samuel , 

Bugby, Claudius 

Bearrisley, Leslie 

Clough, Albert 

Crawford, Wallace W... 

Ferington, Austin 

Greene, George W 

Hayes, Orin E. 

Hay, Wellington 

Hindes, Horace H 

Jay, W illiam T. 

Ketchum, Hiram T 

Laport, Julius 

M<«p. Edcar 

Merritt, Edward 

Myott, Stephen 

M T.'/y, Samuel 

Pike, Ambrose 

Renell, Martin 

Richey, William 

Richey. Robert 

Mono, Francis 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 

do 



July 
Dec. 
May 



Dec. 
Sept. 

May 



Seot. 
May 



July 

>ect. 
July 
May 



beat. 
May 



Oct. 

Seot. 

May 



reo. 

May 

Oct. 

May 

Sept. 

Dec. 

May 

Scut. 

May 



Dec. 
May 



(Mustered out May 22, 1863, when not otherwise staled.) 
1S61 Taken prisoner at the battle of Salem Heights. 

1862 Promoted from 2nd Sgt. to 1st Lieut. 
1861 



Promoted from 4th to 2nd Segt. 
Promoted to Serg't. 
do do 

Promoted to Corpora 1. 
do do 

do do 



10, 
15, 

do- 
do 

9. 
16, 

15. 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 

3°. 
I 5> 
do 
do 
do 
do 

T 5- 

14, 

5> 

15. 
do 

3°> 
15. 

do 

do 

do 
22, 
»5. 
15. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
14, 
15. 

19. 

18, 

50, 

,15, 
do 
do 
do 
I ' » 



do 
do 
do 



1S01 
1S61 
r86i 



Reported a deserter; afterwards taken up. 

1S61 Dropped from rolls 
1S61 

1 So 1 

Wounded at Salem Church, Va. 



i36i 
1S61 



Promoted to Serg't. 
Dropped from rolls. 



1S61 
1S61 
1S61 
1 861 

ib 1 :.: 
1S61 



do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 



Reported deserter; afterwards taken up. 



Dropped from rolls. 

1S61 do do 

1 So 1 do do 

1 So 1 Reported deserted; afterwards taken up. 

Detached as cook; General Hospital, Alexandria, Va. 

Il 



1862 j 

tS-i i 

iS52 ! 
1 86 1 

1861 ! 

1861 I 

jSni t Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 

1861 j 

1S01 



I SOI I 

ISO.I 



;8 



Ros/cr and Record of /he Officers and Men, 



NAME. 



Date oi 
Muster in. 



Remarks. 



Stewart, Andrew 

Stewart, Alexandre 

Stawsin, Julius M.. >cr_;'t 

Slarkey, w ilhs L.. 

Vincent, David 

Welch, Melvin 

Watson, Robert, Corporal 

Wuhenil, Harvey, Musician. 

Eels, John, Musician 

Bruso, October 

Bomaby, Thomas 

Burdo, Joseph 

Dupee, Lewis 

Martin, Joseph 

Manning, William H 

Watson, James H 

Kelley, William N 

Ketchum, Franklin S., Corp'l 
McFaJden, John, Fir^t-Lieut. 

Cook, Martin, Corporal 

Evelith, Asa 

Greene, Robert N 

Guinup, William J 

Houghtaling, Andrew A 

Noakes, Martin 

Richard, William 

Richardson. Sidney L 

Rodden, William 

Rogers, Jasper 

Roberts. Lucius B 

Steele, Murvin L., Musician. 

Stafford, Phiietus 

Bellard, William 

Peters. William. Corporal. . . . 

Covnan, John, Corporal 

Sharp, John, Corporal 

Withera!, Sandford, Corporal. 

Laduke. Mitchell 

Mayo, Henry 

Roden, Joseph B 

Remo, Lewis 

Wei^btman, Edwin 

Lon^held. Ed^ar, Corpora! 

Hay, Wesley, Co: poral 

Lumruis, Horace 

Mock, George F 

Martin, George 

Gloff, Lewis 

Mayon, Fabian 

Juoherne, Henry 

Starkey, William 



•>cpt. 
May 



Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



May 



.^ept. 
Oct. 
May 
July 

May 



^ept. 
May 



July 
Mav 



Julv 
May 

Aug. 

Sept. 

May 

Sept. 

Oct. 

May 

Sept. 



do 
do 
do 
14. 
»5. 
do 
do 
do 
do 

30. 
29, 
3°, 
~9> 
1 1 , 
20, 

do 

do 

i5> 
do 
do 
20, 

19. 

*5, 
5, 
15, 

do 

do 

do 

do 
17, 
15. 

do 

do 
26, 

15. 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

5» 
15. 
do 

22, 

15, 
16, 
22, 
15. 
24. 



I 30 I 

1 B6 1 



1S02 

\V.2 
I3V2 
l352 

1862 

IS62 



IODI 



i362 
IS0I 
iSoi 
1861 
1 36 1 



isoi 
1 36 1 



J 

I rar.Terred to Hattery A, 1st Mass. Artillery. 
Transferred to 121st Reg't, N. Y. S. V. 

do do do 

Transferred to Battery A, 1st Mass. Artillery. 

do do do do 

Transferred to 121st Reg't, N. Y. S. V. 

do do do 

Transferred to Battery A, 1st Mass. Artillery. 
Promoted to Serg't-Maj. 
Died at Washington, D. C. 

do near Ft. Monroe, Va. 
Died at Alexandria. 



do do 

do Harper's P'erry. Va. 

do Burketsville, Va. 

do Bakersville, Md. 

do Albany, N. Y. 

do Alexandria, Va. 

do Crampton Gap, Va. 

do Alexandria, Va. 

do do 

do Mechanicsville. 

do Gaines Hill, Va. 



1 80 1 
1S61 



Missing from Camp Morgan, Albany, N. Y. 



> Wounded at Salem Heights, Va. 



i36i Promoted to Corporal; supposed to be dead. 

do do do 

i3o2 Dropped from rolls. 



IO0I 

i36i 
1 Sot 
1S61 
1 861 

1 36 1 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Missing; supposed to be dead. 
do do do 

do do do 



SURVIVORS OF 1 6th N. Y. VOLS. Musician's. 

L. H. Parish, Watertowu, Mass. 

H. <i. Chandler, Wavcrly, Iowa. 

Jason Thrall, Out. 

FIELD OFFICERS. (i - M. Crosby, Antwerp, N. V. 

X. s. K. Miles, Canton, 
colonels. Miles Washburn, San Diejro, Cal. 

T. A- Davies, tfln Fifth Avenue, Xew York. j Jo. Thrall, Gouverneur, N. Y. 
Joel J. SeaVer, Malonc, \. Y. \ Ambrose Jerome, keesville, N. Y. 

James M. Spencer, Gouverneur, N. Y. 
i.tr.rT. colonels. Ed. Baker, Potsdam. 

Joel J Seaver, Malone. N. V. Kobert Goodrich, Harris ville. X. Y. 

Frank Palmer, PiatLsburgh, X. Y. ( Thomas Parker, Mich. 

Majors i J«>hii Dawson, 191 5th Street, Troy. X. Y. 



Duel Palmer, Pittsburgh, X. Y. 



It. o. Webb, bugler ,y Bradley St.,Watertown, 

N. Y 



Joel J. Seaver. ; j on hn Robinson, drummer, Chateaugay, N 

r rank Palmer. 



John -C. Gilmore, Capt. 34th N. V. Infantry 
War Department, Washington; D. C. 

ADJUTANTS -STAFF. 



i Y. 



PRIVATES. 

Robert P. Wilson, Buffalo, X. Y. company a. of ogoensburg. 

D. A. Nevin, Aspinwall, Isthmus Darien. Henrv Latz, Minneapolis, Minn. 

quaktek masters. A (j/scfacwrierhorn, West Union, Iowa. 

Arthur DeWirt. J. Simmons, Roekwood, Pa. 

W. li. Davies, Ogdensbiirg, X. Y. W. W. Bean, Streator, lit. 

asst. SURGKONS. i J- <>• ,{( '^ Clinton, X. Y. 
,,, . ., , r . John Col vm. Parsons, Kansas. 

Char esC. Murphy L.M.Freeliug, Mason, Mich. 

Charles J. Pardee, .New York- j <• Hurlev 

ch m'i.ains. J. L. Lyon,* Oakland, Cal. 

Andrew M. Millar. Malone. M. H. Latountain. 

Francis B. Hail, Plattsburgh. J atson tobert. Moriah, N. \ . 

Simon Mare can, Ogdensbiirg. 
Edward Simons. Ogdensburg. 
Company A. h A. Thompson, Plattsburjr'h. 

Isaac T. Merry, Og-lensbunr, X Y. William Wei ler Ogdensburg. 

David A. Kevins. Isthmus, Aspinwall. x > llll:im Keed < - Nut - Mu - 11,,!1H ' Montgomery 

Michael Cox, Deeator. 111. I Co., O. 

O. 11. Flagg, Kalamazoo, Mich. Archibald Dixon, Ogdensburg. 

,, i G. Manor. 

Company B. , h.'-C. Trickey, 

F. C. Tapley, Clarkson, X. Y. F. A. Butler. 

Edwin C. Kivapp, 4<K Washington St., N. Y. H. H. Service, Internal Revenue Bureau, 

George L. Eastman. Potsdam. Washington, I). O. 

Company C i James Hardy. Waddiugton. 
„ , ,, . T ' * • " ,. J. R, Cowan, Oakland, Cal. 

Frank Palmer, Plattsburg, N. \ Samuel McBroom, Fine, X. Y. 

Loyal tori. m. James Todd 

Charles L. Jones, Treas. office, \\ ashington. tI , llm Barib, Nat.Mil.Honie, Montgomery Co,. 



I. W. Hare, Manhattan, Will Co.. 111. 



Ohio. 



Company 1). J. E. Hortbn, Bay City, Mieh. 

W H Wailin-- Potsdam Benjamin Edgar, N. Stockholm, N. Y. 

W-m. II. Moms, Koxbury, Kansas. w - H - Daniels, Ogdensburg. 

' James H. ( owau, II s Gearv St., San Francis- 

COMPANY E. CO. Cal. 

It. M. Pierce, Stieklerville, Mo. Michael Sullivan, in Freelon St., 

Company F ■ John Carter, Phiinfield, Wis 

... „ .. , „ ' " .. '. I Ma' tin Gray, Rio, Wis. 

\\ R. Helms, Rodman, N. V. 6-etwxe Mc< 'ovt, KroirhviUe, Wis 

John A. Vance. Potsdam. H s Tllttle Chelsea, Wis. 

H. T. Saniord, All. any. N. \ . 

Company G. company b. of totsdam. 

X. M. Curtis, Ogdensburg, X. Y. Hiram Chandler, Xew Crow Agency, Mon. 

W. L. JF-sr. " John Barclev, Leavenworth. Kan. 

A. E. Bayne, Albany. John Ford, St liejris Falls, N. Y. 

Si">on Yoitder, ('. S. A. War Dept. li»th Inft. Alpheus Carey, Aitchison. Kan. 

John II. Austin, Depeyster, X. Y. Wash. Marsh, Villisea, Iowa. 

Compvny H Behj. F. Baldwin, Denver, Col. 

„. .... ... ", . . V i >- ,- A. C. Baker, Rutland, Yt. 

VYarren Gibson, West Stockholm, N. \. Wm H |j otS f or ,i Canton. X. Y. 

.• W.Wetetvr.Andovor. Dakota. Dennis Brewer, Pc.tsdam. 

A. S. Tucker, West Mockholm. Nathan- C. Bruce, Vmrelica, Wis. 

w ilson Hopkins, < tuppewa rails, \\ is. j M [mrson, Seh<»olcnUt, Mieh. 

Frank Hamilton • C> B< (;l ii_ >„ r wood, X. Y. 

Xeison Cozzeiis. Ft Paso. ( ol, A , y (jhurch, Potsdam. 

Company I. W. W. Crawford, Freemont, Xcb. 

Enos Hinman. Malone. N. Y. j- w - >>=iyi.-. Maple Works, Wis. 

Milton F Uoiierts; Chateamray. wm. Deshane. ( antim. 

S. W. (ileason, Manchester, N. il. * ■ - N !- !J"?»V Cirjtlley, a. 

C. A. Brown, U-wiston, Mo. ' " , < .*- l l , ; U ; 'T- Il " ! " " k '\ f Mi,s " ; - 

( . ( . Fitiohl. Livingston, Mon. 

Company K. m. (; . ;,,]!, rr. Iowa Lake, Iowa. 

W. W. Woo.ls, Wood's Fill-. N. Y. J. It. Freeman, Potsdam. 
C. I. Willson. F. S. A. War Dept. Washington. Alonzo Fuller, Duane, X. Y. 

Win. H. Jamieson, West Chazy, X. Y. Isaac Hancock, Potsclam. 

Henry J. Carlton, " Chas. Heaton, 



' 



Jerry Lacount. Lagrange, HI. 

Horace I,''if. Ndfwuiiii. N. V. 

John .Taker, LaGrange, III. 

Loron Gladden, Potsdam. 

II. F. Morton, Friend, Neb. 

Frank Parody, Potsdam, 

Heriry Parodj . 

S. ('. Perry, < niton, N. Y. 

H. V. Beddington, Waddington, X. V. 

K. Eohan. Newcastle. NeK 

E. H. Smith, Grand Hapals* Mi<rh. 

J. Walsh. 

W. Wilson, Seattle, Wash. Ter. 

C. P. Karnes, Potsdam. 

W. W. Thompson, Albany, X. V. 

Ed. Valliere, Valley Field", P. o. 

Hart Marden, Childwold, X. Y. 

Heck Marden, Bridgeport, Conn. „ 

Daniel Huse, Canton. 

Leonard Perkins, Springfield, Mo. 

George White. Springfield, 111. 

(). D. Seaver, Montrose. MeCook Co., Dakota. 

James Baird. 

John J. Webber, 4^"> KithSt., X. W. New York 

James Neville, Montreal. P. Q. 

C. X. Mnnson, Kansas Citv, Mo. 
Mahlon Botsford. X. Y. City, 
Nelson MeCueii. San Francisco, Cal. 
Orson A. Bitidley, Trowbridge, Mien. 
Darius Sprague, care of Post at Norwood. 
John Laughlin, Fondulac, Wis. 

W. FitzGibbons, Saranae, Mich. 
Calvin Morton. 
Tip Morton. 
A. E. Clark. 
Harvey dough. 

Alex. MeFee, Custer. Bisr Stone Co., Minn. 
Miles Grennon. Union. 111. 
E. X. Desmond. 1319 Columbia St., Dallas, 
Texas. 
H. G. Chase. Burlington, Vt. 
H. W.Trumble. Erie. Cass To., Dak. 
H. H. Raymond, Johnson, Vt. 
Darwin Tennev, Colton. 
Thomas Hurd, Mass. 
G. J. Clark, Chetek, Barron Co, Wis. 
John F. Parker. Wrightstown, Wis. 
Joseph Perry, Angelica, Wis. 
Winnie Smith, Prairie Du Chien. Wis. 
Isaac Wilcox, Christie. Wis. 
William Hume. 

Company C. of Flattsburoh. 

M. F. Irish. Potsdam. 

D. McCarthy, P. < '. Box 313, Friendship, X. Y. 
Timothy Cronin, Now burg, X. Y. 

Fred Doyle, 7fkS Park Avenue, Brooklyn. 

J. V. Howes. Plattsburg. 

L. C. Bullis, Sft'wj It. It. St., Syracuse. 

Wm. W. Christian, Saranae, N. V. 

George W. Collins, '" 

Lorenzo Downey, Clayburjrh. NT. Y. 

.Ino. Eshman, < Mean. 

I ill Flanders. Saranae. 

William Grant, Plattsburgrh. 

Peter L-troek. Schuyler Falls, 

.John ( »sterman, < >lcan. 

Josoi.li Pat raw. Plattsburgh. 

kirh'd liyau, 1~M North St., Burlington, Vt. 

Chas. W. 1). I.'iumcll, Minneapolis Minn. 

<L W. Sovey, Chniraiijrny Lake, N. Y. 

Edwin Smith. Paittsi ui-jh. 

G. C.Stiies. PlatT>l ur.h 

Lalayettc Tot ivy. 

I 'avid . Werthby, Saranae. 

Chaimcey G. Darrah, Saranae. 

Stephen G. Williams, Clint"nviHo, N. Y. 

Winslow Z. Watson, I-alrnburir ("enter, N. Y. 

Charles W. Huntington, larisln ille. 

David L. Meader, Manhattan, Will Co., 111. 

Lewis Garnpy, Ellenburjr Center, N. Y. 

Lewis Corfu v, MolKtsvillo. X. Y. 

Edward McCarthy, I. yon Mt., N. Y. 

S. W.Cochran, Picrreinmt, N. Y. 

Melvin Tucker, Lyon Mt. 

Asher Collins, Moriah, 

Stephen Tucker, Ciiateatigay Like. 

T. Harris, I bur .- n. Mich. 

F/ekiel .Ion, is. Alma Center, Wis. 



E. J. Cuhlev, Ravenswood, III. 
John Milliard, Ottawa. 111. 
John Ford, Dannemoia. N. Y. 
Darius Washburn, Pei u. X. Y. 
Joseph Mooney, Black 13 rook, X. Y. 
Thomas Park.-, Dannemoia, X. V. 
John II. Turner, Saranae Like. 
O.rville Washburn, Chatcaugav Lake. 
John Motlitt, 
James Slaven, 
Wallace W. Dow, 
Bui us Kobinson, Saranae. N. Y. 
Lewis Crary, MolTitsville, X. Y. 
Bedford Dustin, Bedl'ord, X. Y. 
Uobert Chattel ton. CBntonville, N. Y. 
John LaPan, Eilcuhiirgh Center. 
George Corbin, Plattsburg. 
Wallace Wilcox, Bedl'ord. 
Elijah Vogau, Auburn, N. Y. 
James Varuo. 
John Clark. 
Andrew Power. 
Henry Felton. 
George Hill, Sheffield, Vt. 
L. Tupper, Lyon Mountain. 
Israel Ostrander, Cal. 

William A. Smith. Saranae. 
Melvin C. Collins, Saranae. 
B.O.Webb, Xo. 3, liradtev St., Watertown, 
N. Y 

Company D. of Gouvkrnkuk. 
Henry Kogers, Gouverneur. 
Loyal H. liiaucher, Muir, Mich. 
Ei). Grothier, Waterfown. 
J. W. Lamphere. Hartford, Mich. 
L. H. Maxam, Malone. 
Peter McLaren. 
Jos. Pangevine. 
Jas. Skinner, Gouverneur. 
O. K. Slupman, Ilailesl orough, X. Y. 
Alfred Thayer, :.'H Cooper St.. Jackson, Mich. 
Eph Thompson, Natural Bridge, X. V. 
S. A. Whitford. 
A. Vickery. 

L. H. Moiuthrop. Cornwall, Ont. 
Bob. Wornock. 

J. H. Winslow, South Edwards, X. Y. 
John C. Clark. Bienville, X. V. 

F. M. Haiie, Gouverneur. 

T. W. Hilts, Oscoda. Mich., or 143 Claybum 
Place, Chicago, 111. 

James MeKee, Detroit, Mich. 

T. S. Smith. 

Harrison Maine. Hermon, X. Y. 

John C. Eager, HaileshoroUgh, St. Law. Co., 
j X. Y. 

George Hill, Wegatchie, X. Y. 

James K. Livingston, Onuverneur, N. Y. 
j Henry J. Miller. Harvard. 111. 

James T. McCombs, Gouverneur, or Hailes- 
I borough, X. V . 

Mattison F. Dimock. 

David E. Downing, Macomb, X. Y. 

Jason N. Frcdcnbttrg, oil City, Pa. 

Ezra J. Pool, Gouverneur. 

Chas. Swem. Fine, or Fullerville Iron Works. 
X. Y. 

Bebert Thayer. 

Jas. K. Livingston, care Post 156, St. Law. 
j Co.. X. Y. 

! L.J. Ayers, Gouverneur. 
I William Thayer, Gouverneur. 

Anthony Tompkins, Shawville, St. Law. Co., 
! N. V. 

John Valentine, Harrisonville, Lewis Co. 
! X. Y. 

G. H. Drowns, Heedsburty, Wis. 
Michael Tin, Sprimr Valley, Wis. 
Clarence Leaving, Dele\"nn, Wis. 
Charles H. Sabiu, Manitowoc, Wis. 
Charles I. Gardner, Capo Vincent, X. Y. 
Ansil Tompkins. Gouverneur. 
Frank Elurcllc. 
Gcortro Dabeoek. Norwood, X. Y. 

Com tan v E, or Pi. atts union. 

If. *\ Damigh, Washington, D. C. 

L. J. Pi« ■iv.', Owaseo, Mo. 
Alfred Guise, Plattsburgh, X. Y. 



Buffalo, N. V 



N. V. 



X. Y. 
forks 



N. Y. 



J. L. (J rant, 

Daniel Pauley, 234 Watson St.. 
Mil- . Itovey, Mark tt<-, Mtch. 
Chas. Foiirina, Bedford, N. V. 

Jus. Jenkins, Prairie Star, Neb. 
Wm. bane. 

L. C. Tite^mb, Webster, X. H. 
.1. Myers, Weyauwegu, Wis. 
Tims. Bboney. 

Win. It. Apps, Morrisonville, N. V. 
J no. A . Sullivan. 
Henry Shelly, Ro>rcrsnold, X. V. 
Henry Sehttuedle. Hospital Steward, U. S. A., 
Syr. GenPs office, Wash ing ton, D. C. 
MeGuire Wei let, Plattsburg, v. V. 
(has. Petit, Clinton viik', N. V. 
John Daw-on. Ml ">th Street, Trojr, 
.Tiis. Christian, Danuemuru, \. Y. 
Mitchell Bully, Pittsburgh. 
Peter Amore, Morrisonville. 
(Jeorge Staves, Plattsburgh. 
Nelson. Staves, 
Albert Marshall. 
Peter l erry, Saranac, X. Y. 
James Gulden, Morrisonville, 
Hiram VanNorman, Ausable 
James Nurcross, Altonaor Woods Kails, N. Y. 
Peter Laroek, Plattsburgh. 
Stedrran Stiles. 
George Utiles. 
William A key, 

Stepen Tupper, Bellraoht, X. Y. 
Sands N. Pike, Ellcnburgh, X. Y. 
Put' us Palmer, Ingraham, Clinton Co., N. Y. 
Henry W. Weber, Cornwall, <>nt. 

COMPANY F. OF POTSDAM. 

John Dyke, NieholVilie, X. Y. 

Jo*; Cardinell. Potsdam. 

Edgar Grossman, Pierpont, X Y. 

Henry Dove. Streator, 111. 

H. M* Haves. Sherman City, Mich. 

C. \\ . Leiloey, care Post 1»>S, Highland, X. Y. 

Ransom Mathews. Denver, Dakota. 

Asaph Dodge, llo-7St. N.E. Washington, D.C. 

J. H. MeCurry, Ogdensbui'g. 

A. K. Sayles, Norfolk, N. Y. 

John Shaw, Norwood. 

Oel Austin, Norwood. 

H. t. Love, F.ureka. Cal. 

Thomas Austin, Boulder, Col. 

Jehial M. Hambiin. Spartinsburg, Pa. 

Newell E Dimick, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Antoinc Deshaoe. 

Kichard Lamb. 

Chas. H. Hodskin, Ft. Jackson, N. Y. 

William F. Adams. Norfolk. 

K. J. San ford, Niehoh ilie, X. Y. 

Wni. Day, 

Wm. H. Harvey, 

S. N. Stevens. North Lawrence, N. Y. 

Wm. Goodcourage, "* 

.his. Cook. Colton. 

l.eander Ellison. Hayes City, Kansas. 

l.'obert Griswold, Stockholm Depot. X. Y. 

Hiram Hammond, St. Rejris Falls. 

Henry Hoiiidav, Masseua, N. V. 

Bliss HoHiday, 

Samuel Brown, Vermont. 

Nathan Hodge, Nieholvillc.^ 

Ale.v. Barnhart. Cornwall, < >nt. 

Kt'iiben ( I'riswold, Sprinyticld, Mo. 

David Collins, Lohrvillo, Calhoun Co„ Iowa 

James Webb, Bock Kim, Pierce Co, Wis. 

James Arlington, Furmington Station, Minn. 

Ia?\ i Kelly, Fulton. N. V. 

Henry Brown. Waddinsrton, X. Y. 

Martin Wait, South Colton, 

L. Sharron, South Haven, Midi. 

JohnT. Mott. Juniata. Adams Co, Neb. 

Alexander Bangle. 

Da\ id Roach. 

Wm. Allen. 

Geo. Witherell. 

John Dyke, Xicholville. X. V. 

Joseph Bruce. 

Samuel (i. Bruce, St. Regis Falls, X. Y. 

Charles w. Johnson, Brasher Fails, *■ 

Joseph D. Lamb. 



L. C. Howard, Massena, 

Cornelius Miller, " 

George Brownell, Palmyra, Wis. 

Charles Foster, Forest City, Dakota. 

Timothy Parrel I. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Hiram H. Bust, Ellcnburgh Depot, N. Y. 

John Crowley, Augusta, Wis. 

S. S. Thomas, Xicholville. X. Y. 

Willis Shattuck, Brasher Fall, X. Y. 

W. P. Foote, Bellville, Iowa. 

John Buttertield, Humbird, Clark Co., Wis. 

Stone, St, Paul. Minn. 

James Webb, Rock Elm, Wis. 

COMPANY G. OF DEPFYSTFR. 

G. L. Johnson, Maquoketa, Iowa. 

Julius C. Bishop, Gouverneur. 

John F. Russell, Hokah, Minn. 

Thomas FieldsOn, 2806 Market St., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

James McKelvey, Juniata, Kan. 

Emerson Bostwick, Park City, Utah. 

Anthony Adams, Santa Rosa, Mo. 

Edwin (». Rett*, Accotink, Va. 

Charles S. Blood, Heuvelton, X. Y. 

David Backus, Mapieton, Cass Co, Dakota. 

John Delack, Morristown, X. Y. 

William Fieldson, Fdcnton, St Law Co, N. Y. 

Charles B. Jillson, Nappa City, Cal. 

William Mayne ;>d, Heuvelton, X. Y. 

Henry Mills. Ogdcnsburg. 

Jones L. Reed, State Center, Iowa. 

Theodore H. Stevens, Tuscola, Mich. 

Daniel Austin, jr, Doland, Spink Co, Dakota. 

Amos H. Dean, North Lawrence, X. Y. 

John Goodeson, Dekalb, X. Y. 

William Henry Bell, Heuvelton. 

Rollin Burnham, Storm Lake, Iowa. 

Thomas B. Chilton, Hermon, N. Y. 

James E. Chaffee, Heuvelton. 

William M. Dean. DeGrasse, St Law Co, N. Y. 

George H. Flcc-tham. Depeyster. 

William E. Gore, Bienville, N. Y. 

Edwin If. Hulett, Heuvelton. 

Charles Hill, 14 i Clavburu Place, Chicago, 
III. 

Geo. W. Kitiir, Fort Collins, Col. 

James Murphy, Gouverneur. 

Charles Poor, jr., Dekalb. 

John Timmons, Leadville, Col. 

Denny Tinner. Pierce. Pierce Co, Xcb. 

Oliver Wells, Morrisonville. X. Y. 

Samuel Wardell. Heuvelton. 

George Brown, Hammond, X. Y. 

William K. Galloway, Fan Claire, Wis. 

Daniel Hart, Russell, X. Y. 

Elisha A. Phillips, Green Bay, Wis. 

(Jeorge B. Elliot. Arlington, Kan. 

John Q- 'Conner, Miles City, Montana. 

Benjamin Goodeson, Downing Station, Wis. 

Samuel Baxter, New Baltimore, Green Co.. 
X. Y. 

Amos H. Benson, Tidioute, Warren Co, Pa. 

Nathaniel Fisher, Leadville, Col. 

John Hackett, Ellenburgh, X. Y. 

Hugh Ballentine, Janesville, Iowa. 

Joseph Roberts. Plattsburg, X. Y. 

George 1*. Raven, New Westminster, B. C. 

Francis P. Heath, Diamond Springs, Mich. 

Valentine Benson, care Post Tidioute. War- 
ren Co, Pa. 

Robert Dempsey, Clayburgh, X. Y. 

Joseph H. Western, St. Cloud, Minn. 

COMPANY II. OF STOCKHOLM. 

Francis A. Englehart, Middleport, X. V. 

Samuel Heath. Falls Village, Conn. 

Ben.j. F. Heath, Littleton, X. H. 

Wm. H. Finch, Tonawanda, X. Y. 

Nelson L. Trussell, Stockholm. X. Y. 

Jerry Converse, Potsdam. 

J. F. Breekenridgc, 310 Hudson Ave Albany. 

Henry Fulsom, Fo.vhoro, Mass. 

O. Wriirht. 

Con Huntington, San Diego, Cal. 

Geo. A. Wight, Streator, III. 

Daniel Collins, Lohrville, Calhoun Co., Iowa. 

Willis Merrill, West Stockholm. N. Y. 

Alex Kemberly, Oconto, Wis. 



Fred Sails, Pi< riMMit Center, X. Y. Thomas Snllivnn 

Henry Kommn, Norfolk. N. V. Th«»iTUwS Whifcliouse 

v\ .,;■ i I h ■ S«>. Harttord.N. V. AIIrc-«l Bradford 

Al i in Arnold. '■ i, V't. Ezra S. Bullis 

r. [{. S'uimi >r Moil i, \. V. Edw i I'd Graville. 

Uilej B. Wilkins, N. Stockholm, N. Y. • Charles >1 Hiiliker: 

E- '•'■ ■ Ikin^, '* Company K, of Woods Eai.i.s. 

A ex. A Mills. North I aw encc. V x . . Burns S. botljre. snarta, Wis. 

Nelson Lauber, I.a\> e. Thus. Barnaby. West Chazy, X. Y. 

Andrew.!. Locke, Bvnsner rails. 2*. Y. W.a.mi,: :- [• tts iirsrh, N. Y. 

<;•:-!;.! m-bin, mo. . ru, Summ M imou, Moocs.N. Y. 

'!' I:1 ; -- ;; V: •■ • ;; ': : • '-• „ ., ttol .. War-.,-. ..; null. X. V. 

truneis \. (Jark.I anshvnie, >». \. Nathan Docker, Ironville. E sex Co., X.Y. 



Levi Bock wood, West Stuck holm. 



Aii>ert U'o 'i"s, Albany, X. V. 



.Lotltam A. Loon. " G.M. Baldwin. Malohe, X.Y. 

& ',• ,,- !', 1 -'- A " am> - , „ Chas. Grant, ear.- Post 1, Portland, Oregon. 

W. D. We lis. M. Charles. Mi Geo. W. Gi-een, EIIcdI.tm- N. V. 

Lorenzo Page. North Moekholm, " Samuel A. Gonyea, Post :W2, Saranac, N. Y. 

Horace Vv ltKius, u auaunrtori, p MeGorris 

w -l;'^' J- w ' ; ;;;''- *•>;' i;; ' ; ; i: ; ! - . *\. T) Oren fc.. Havs, Wadhams Mills, X. V. 

H.H. Muniiy, \VL-st>prmjrhcl(l, hne Co, Pa. i Melvin Weleh L'Ucnbur-'li 

Joel P Moses. Potsdam. j Gco . w Walker, Coffey vi He, Kansas. 

[Uitus\Vaiston,Aipna, rowa, Stephen Mvott Elienhurir. 

L K Ma-rum, >maha, Neb <- L . (; . H \vf,tters, Pou^hkeepsie, X.Y, 

Julius strobeek, Colton, V \. Wm \v 00 dviHe. [heckenrid<re,CoL 

Darwin Kuril. urt, ^blev. Iowa. Alfred Joimtai r, Bedford. X. Y. 

;; • s v A; ;V"v :S( ' ;Kvl , ' • r ,,. Herman Muffleman, * ational Soldiers Home, 

Charles H. Berrv, Kin Bose >t.. Lacrosse, >V is. to« v iH Me 

H .It. Dwrkee* Lake Geneva, Wis. Samuel Muzzv. Saranue. 

L. B. « >sjrood, Mapleworks, A is. Moses H. Sfarweil 

r, a t>, ,V' iMi 'r VN V nF maloxb. K . w . Steel, MOoex* [forks, X. Y. 

B. S. Ph:i lips, fcaiii ( lam?. w is. Lewis Kevmond. care Post D. Rutland, V.t. 

Henry H Ellis, ricouderojra, X \ . Wm r ,£ lte& , , uklaIuL N . y. 

Miner Hilhard. <■ j/ Seajnan 

Cornelius Hugaboom, Sacramento, Cal. Flunks. Ketch am, Brooklyn. X. Y. 

Simon E. Bemis, Esther* die. Iowa Ca{)t H H Ketclsani. £; i C. S. Imt.. V. S. A. 

P rediis C.\ an Hum, New Haven. Conn. Wur D ,. pr Wa^ninutr.n. 1;. C. 

Charles V\Bug1»ee Jus Neville. ^Sr.i.orch: stoi : t. Montreal. P. ( L ». 

\>. W Biirber, East ( onstable, M. W. A Smith. MoJli^viUi.-, Clinton Co., X. V. 

J ; '.'vi;ain i Je n:s M. ;;.'. ; Joseph < ...nvca, Cadwilte CliuTon Co.. X.Y. 

^eoi-HeW Hubbard, rustm ( .ty.Cal. Enistus ( 'arpenter. Peru, X. V. 

Marshall Amtdon. Montpcher, \!. roseph [)otv 

M. E. Uoberts. Chateau^ay, N. Y. George M. isal.-iwiu Mai one, X. Y. 

MA. Kennedy, C;iibert Lttpoint, West I hazv, X. Y 

Juhus>ancomb, _ Julius Laport, M<»..ei-s, X, Y. 

l.ouissancomb Edgar Moss, White Lake, Aurora Co., Dak. 

tharles >ancomb, John Nicho -, s M oocrs l-'orks, X. Y. 

J««n ttulinwin, Joseuh ««w«i«i, Mooevs. 

Mj n,n »»«tley Lou{s }>ltt , L m l ublirKhm . ■• 

Gcotge A. Heteher Ed. J. Monroe, Lemon, Wis. 

Levi ^nconb Malone. N, \. Sanford Witherell, W<k ('hazy. 

K chard Chtlord, Gideon It. Hewitt. 

' • iL ~): V' ''" ' , •■ Phillips AWrich, 

P.>n r, E. l-^eresr, Claudius Bu^bee. 

•, IP; " '\ '■■"'• i - Martin Bromiev. . '■' ' 

T'' 1 '■ l »'!" n » ha .^ .. Albert Heddin*r. 

•'" ' ' ■■<-•■••••• .. Horace Loomis. 

CL A. Br wn. Lewiston. Maine. F, 2S m l t 

W iliiaiu 1). Boston. Uhode Island. )) \\ a p .■ f - >,ann,l,ff ' 

'.. ^nn,,.En : o : ,. ! ,X.Y. MvnniL,. 

runothv t'.. Manni.x. w;m..,« . !';.>,,,.)• 

AmhcMT. Stewart. West v ill e Center, X. Y. \tK",r ? 

. , , ■ ... •) ' »^M)ii Mart m . 

• ^'iS i:iV "v- ::•"-" : " r ,. James Mott, West Chazv. 

\\:i . ; , .- ■ _, •. m . ,-. . Company Cnknoavx. 

Joliu j; ac> Mai->i Georjre W. it! iclc. 

i X.at'.i ButlcrSt. Madi- John Erse man. 1015 South »Hh St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

; : ,..: in ■■ . Maiuiu*. ■Ln i - ( arry. Atticii, X. V. 

p u t f] nka, I i\u .; uray. William E. Piittei-so.ii 

N'iiftian IhirUmr. Matone. \V. H. llayson. ».-ure' Post ]<■■:, Sheffield, rowa. 

.'.:■,, r- .v ..:.:':•::■•■. U'is .lohn Hughes, Ward's Is! ind, X. Y. 

S. \\ I :... . |s. Wis. Boi « rt Lucas, Alexandria. Va. 

• ■ tt'vthe! : - • Wis. •'"• Cibs m. 15 ir^ess, M.i h. 

Am; u .m '.\. ( ■ ■;-,_■ ;-. i ... a N eles, Cal. James Y< ..-. 

I .- . ,. M.-:., .. ..-• • -• ■. \. y. II< • . ( iroton, X. Y. 

Wiihioii i'. Xev rend. Burke C< nter, X. Y. ' '■• ' " " I ■•-. •' Snuvv-ille, X Y. 

i, ... \v. Kosa. Sai-al . " Ed Bell, Tntuiwandu, N V 

ir |{. Smith, Eaiiiield. Kranklin i\h Iowa. L H I alo care Post :V>, Kimball, Dak 

wijuiof .1. Berry. If iieyiV. Su rdain. 

i • ihan. Patrick Joyce Li '• T >' ' r . v 

i !.,-. les Luther, M i. Wis., care i ' \ X 

w. u it. 

. ciare'n. LuciiMi M I'armeter, Beatrice, Gagrc Co.. 

i : \^ i.l v Xeb. 

Siimucl M ;:■ - Thomas Matteson. Peshtiiro, Wis. 
. II. M< Donald. Itiwket Uiver, St. Law. Co.. A. E Bouse. Merrill, Wis. 

\ y Henry Parlou . Idi rou. N V 



5748